Personal gear review

tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Tony
I just came back from shipping out the cameras I sold and delivering a car load of stuff to the local thrift store. My musical gear collection has been significantly reduced, and for the first time in a long time, I’m down to a single ILC and native lens, the X-T1 + 23mm WR. I’ve been contemplating these steps for a long time, and finally decided it was time. This is not my first gear purge, but it is the most thorough one yet. The shelves behind my desk that were once covered in camera gear are now barren except for a few old film cameras I kept for display. I once had dozens of adapted lenses of many brands. I did keep a single legacy lens, the Pen F 38mm f1.8. I like the way that lens renders and its size. I think it and my X-T1 will be my gear for Single in April.
 

mnhoj

gee aahrr
Jan 27, 2012
Los Angeles
John
I have a very fluid relationship with gear. To the point where it's more of an extended rental.
I've recently found an extreme desire/satisfaction to explore the world of portraiture. This has led me to a few specific tools/toys that I'm very happy with.

A decent lighting kit, FF mirrorless body, F2.8 wide mid zoom and a fast 85mm.
 

tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Tony
I have a very fluid relationship with gear. To the point where it's more of an extended rental.
I've recently found an extreme desire/satisfaction to explore the world of portraiture. This has led me to a few specific tools/toys that I'm very happy with.

A decent lighting kit, FF mirrorless body, F2.8 wide mid zoom and a fast 85mm.
I have often thought that way, looking at my gear as an extended rental. I would like to settle on a long term combination . . .
 
Dec 31, 2013
Louisville, Ky
I have a very fluid relationship with gear. To the point where it's more of an extended rental.
I have often thought that way, looking at my gear as an extended rental. I would like to settle on a long term combination . . .
This is the way I have always been. With one exception. I found some love with the X-Pro2. Even though it was often not the best, or even the right tool for the job. But, I have sold it and I am shooting just with the X-T2.
 

tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Tony
This is the way I have always been. With one exception. I found some love with the X-Pro2. Even though it was often not the best, or even the right tool for the job. But, I have sold it and I am shooting just with the X-T2.
I gave serious thought to getting an XP2, but I shoot at low angles from time to time. I know from using the X100 body types that can be a bit cumbersome without a tilting screen.
 

tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Tony
Unless I was to come across a crazy deal that was just too good to ignore, I won't be buying any more cameras for a while. And even then, I've made an agreement with myself (and shared it with my wife): one in, one out.
 

theoldsmithy

Hall of Famer
Jan 7, 2013
Cheshire, England
Martin Connolly
Clear out time. I shot on holiday with my RX100 III and hated it. In strong, mostly low angle sunlight neither the screen nor EVF were any use at all. Most of my shots were press & pray, I had no clear idea what I was capturing. So that’s gone. Also, my adventure with film is coming to an end, I think. The camera are interesting mechanical devices, but, for me, the cost of processing and tedium of scanning don't really justify the end results over digital. YMMV of course. Maybe I’ve prioritised cheapness over quality in my gear choices but have you seen the price of good quality film gear these days? Sheesh. Aanyway... I’m keeping a couple of the more esoteric items, but funds from the rest, plus the RX100, have been re-invested in a black X100T...watch this space!!
 
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Biro

Hall of Famer
Aug 7, 2011
Jersey Shore
Steve
for me, the cost of processing and tedium of scanning don't really justify the end results over digital.
It is true that shooting film was a lot easier back when the market and system were set up for it. It ends up being a lot more work now. So, unless one actually enjoys the process - and some do - it's probably better to stick to digital.

So how many cameras will you be down to after picking up the X100T?
 

theoldsmithy

Hall of Famer
Jan 7, 2013
Cheshire, England
Martin Connolly
It is true that shooting film was a lot easier back when the market and system were set up for it. It ends up being a lot more work now. So, unless one actually enjoys the process - and some do - it's probably better to stick to digital.

So how many cameras will you be down to after picking up the X100T?
I’ll have the Panasonic G7 and X100T on the digital team, (plus my Huawei phone which produces astonishingly good images) and a motley selection of filmies - 5 of them, down from a high point of 12 about 6 months ago. I still have several rolls of unexpired film, so I might as well use those up over the next few months, but I will be concentrating more on digital.
 
Unless I was to come across a crazy deal that was just too good to ignore, I won't be buying any more cameras for a while. And even then, I've made an agreement with myself (and shared it with my wife): one in, one out.
I try to avoid making such remarks; it's too awkward to have to explain that I changed my mind or don't want to keep my promises :eek:.
 
Apr 18, 2014
Boston Burbs
David
I have a very fluid relationship with gear. To the point where it's more of an extended rental.....
I have often thought that way, looking at my gear as an extended rental. I would like to settle on a long term combination . . .
This is the way I have always been. With one exception. I found some love with the X-Pro2. Even though it was often not the best, or even the right tool for the job. But, I have sold it and I am shooting just with the X-T2.
Same here and I've actually planned on an "extended rental" a few times. Back when I shot Nikon DX I "rented" the older 80-400 VR 3-4 times for vacations. I couldn't justify hanging on to it and really renting it for a month at a time would have cost a lot more than the $100 it tended to cost each time.

I know how you feel about the X-Pro, for me it's been the X70. I've owned and sold it twice now, so far the Pen F taking it's place well.

......Also, my adventure with film is coming to an end, I think. The camera are interesting mechanical devices, but, for me, the cost of processing and tedium of scanning don't really justify the end results over digital. .....
I made the digital over film choice back around 2003/4. I'd almost always had some camera and wanted to get more into photography. The SLR bodies I was looking at were about $400-$450. Nikon had just released the D70 and Canon had the original Digital Rebel at about $1,000. The difference was about 65 rolls of film. I think I must have shot 15k-20k images with the D70 or 450-500 rolls of 36 exposure film.
 

mnhoj

gee aahrr
Jan 27, 2012
Los Angeles
John
I made the digital over film choice back around 2003/4. I'd almost always had some camera and wanted to get more into photography. The SLR bodies I was looking at were about $400-$450. Nikon had just released the D70 and Canon had the original Digital Rebel at about $1,000. The difference was about 65 rolls of film. I think I must have shot 15k-20k images with the D70 or 450-500 rolls of 36 exposure film.
For me it was 2005, a D50 and a 50mm 1.8.
It started then and I've had a great run.
Not very sensible. But loads of fun.

A few of the golden memories come to mind.
D700 with the 105DC.
5D with 135L.

Edit: And the 180 2.8 - oh my.
It was all about the longer lenses back then.
 
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Bruce McL

Regular
Dec 18, 2016
Well, there’s collecting cameras and then there’s using cameras. A guy named Daniel Kahneman talks about two different kinds of happiness, remembered happiness and experienced happiness. Pursuing one is not better than pursuing the other. As long as you can keep priorities and budget sorted out, it’s all good.

There have been cameras I bought because owning one would put a smile on my face, and there have been cameras and lenses I bought in search of better photos or a better experience taking photos.

The yearly review is a good way to take stock of what I’ve put in to photography and what I’ve gotten out of it on the past year. In early 2019 I decided to take a break for a year. I’d been doing too many things by habit, and not enjoying photography very much.

Image quality has gotten so much better in 20 years. I don’t think I need to spend time trying to get the best possible color and resolution out of every photo in Lightroom like I did back in the early days.

Taking photos with a recent model iPhone convinced me of this, but it just doesn’t make me happy to use one. I ordered a small, light ILC in December, a “Serious Compact,” which is the kind of camera I enjoy. I’m looking forward to it’s arrival.

This time around I’m planning on doing more pre and less post processing, spending more time getting things right in the moments before I take the photo rather than in the days afterwards.
 

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