M-Mount PIXII rangefinder with M mount: bold move ...

Leica M-Mount cameras and lenses
OK, you are working manual. I like the "A" route. Just select the lens opening, let the camera decide and if it is screwed up too bad there is post. I underexpose by 1/3 just so I have room to turn up the light should I need to.

Which makes me think I will write David Barth and suggest that the camera do an on-the-fly white balance from a pocket card just as Leica and others do. I do not think it can now do that. I'll check that out.
 

agentlossing

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You know what camera I think it a close competitor for the Pixii is another which didn't get a whole lot of traction: the Leica CL. Obviously it's an EVF instead of a rangefinder, but in other ways, it closely matches the price, the sensor size, and the overall quality. L-mount instead of M, but easily adaptable to M. I was a bit surprised the CL didn't achieve a bit more success, but if it means it will be cheaper on the used market, there's a chance I can pick one up.
 

agentlossing

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OK, you are working manual. I like the "A" route. Just select the lens opening, let the camera decide and if it is screwed up too bad there is post. I underexpose by 1/3 just so I have room to turn up the light should I need to.

Which makes me think I will write David Barth and suggest that the camera do an on-the-fly white balance from a pocket card just as Leica and others do. I do not think it can now do that. I'll check that out.
That works if you have a sensor with enough DR at both ends. I've shot M4/3 for so long that I am a bit more of a control freak when it comes to exposure... although, for me, control freak means setting an exposure in M to retain highlights, and letting shadows fall where they may. Or, on the GR with its awesome highlight-weighted metering, dialing in exposure comp based on lighting conditions and then mostly letting it do its thing. I do something similar for film - such as metering off the pavement and underexposing slightly, letting that be my shadow treatment.
 
That works if you have a sensor with enough DR at both ends. I've shot M4/3 for so long that I am a bit more of a control freak when it comes to exposure... although, for me, control freak means setting an exposure in M to retain highlights, and letting shadows fall where they may. Or, on the GR with its awesome highlight-weighted metering, dialing in exposure comp based on lighting conditions and then mostly letting it do its thing. I do something similar for film - such as metering off the pavement and underexposing slightly, letting that be my shadow treatment.

OK, it looks like the Pixii will be judged by its metering. The upside is that these folks at Pixii are motivated and can write good code. The code is the key on this camera. It is a software camera as opposed to a hardware camera. Yes, light meters are electronic but with this camera the whole thing is software, short of the RF. I believe, but do not know, that this is a fortuitous intersection of programmers, photographers and engineers. It is a first.
 
You know what camera I think it a close competitor for the Pixii is another which didn't get a whole lot of traction: the Leica CL. Obviously it's an EVF instead of a rangefinder, but in other ways, it closely matches the price, the sensor size, and the overall quality. L-mount instead of M, but easily adaptable to M. I was a bit surprised the CL didn't achieve a bit more success, but if it means it will be cheaper on the used market, there's a chance I can pick one up.

Matt Osborne on YT has covered this. The CL is a good camera. I had the loan of the old one back when I lived in Montreal and liked it a lot. That was the old film version. I believe you are talking about current, also a good camera.

Of the little I know it seems to me that Leica is stumbling. They have a market for the "M" line but that will not keep the lights on in Wetzlar. They have a small SLR market, too. But a lot of Japanese companies have eaten their lunch and now it seems the French may. Will the Chinese get into the market or will they be happy with lenses and accessories? Because the market seems to be shrinking because of cell phones.

I am pleased I have ordered a Pixii. I will be more pleased if it ever gets here.
 

agentlossing

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Just going to drop this in here and say... it looks pretty nice.

 
Just going to drop this in here and say... it looks pretty nice.

You are the devil. I have a new Benq arriving today and have squandered about all I need to squander for a while. I guess we will see these items show up now as the Pixii sells more. And its form factor is close enough to Leica that only little mods are required to make the case.

Oh, I wish I had been born rich instead of handsome.
 
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William Lewis

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Hayward WI
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You are the devil. I have a new Benq arriving today and have squandered about all I need to squander for a while. I guess we will see these items show up now as the Pixii sells more. And its form factor is close enough to Leica that only little mods are required to make the case.

Oh, I wish I had been born rich instead of handsome.
I'd go here LuigiCases and see if Luigi would make a case for it. His stuff is exquisite. I love the one I currently have and once upon a lifetime ago he made a custom one for my Canon 7.
 

Lawrence A.

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Larry
Built in storage only makes it a non-starter for me. I'd love a real rangefinder alternative to Leica, which I cannot afford.
Even a fixed lens rangefinder would work for me, as long as it was a real rangefinder.
But this camera is a little too much Pixii dust for me.
 
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agentlossing

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It is too bad that it's limited to built in storage, considering the OS itself has the potential for a lot of expansion and innovation. The way this camera is programmed is kind of how cameras should have been for a long time now. We are still stuck on limited, proprietary OSes which are really only half an OS, and have limited flexibility to be expanded with firmware. This is a Linux-based platform that can be changed as the developers see fit. That's cool. But to stay future-proof for a while, it should have either a typical old SD card slot, or (better yet) expandable or replaceable storage. However, I guess, just buy the version with enough storage space that you won't likely run into a problem.
 
For those of us not averse to pixie dust the internal storage on mine is 32GB. FWIW that is the storage of an M8, M8.2, M9 and the M240. Internal storage can go up to 128GB. RTFM Data is removed by either inserting a USB stick or plugging the camera into a computer. Both of these ways do not necessitate the removing of a bottom plate and then the removal of an SD card. No, instead just insert something into the camera's USB port. Pretty simple. It's 2022. Check your calendars.

This camera is a LInux computer with a lens.
 
Some of you may remember The Tappet Brothers, Click and Clack, Frank and Ray Magliozzi. A lady called in one day with a Toyota station wagon which had been giving her grief. And the guys in the shop kept harassing her and telling her it was a dog.

First thing one of The Tappet Brothers says is, "Lady, lady, first of all don't go back to this shop. Stay away from people who upset you." Mechanics know this. Why did it take me so long? I follow it now.
 

DeeJayK

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Seattle, WA, USA
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Keith
For those of us not averse to pixie dust the internal storage on mine is 32GB. FWIW that is the storage of an M8, M8.2, M9 and the M240. Internal storage can go up to 128GB. RTFM Data is removed by either inserting a USB stick or plugging the camera into a computer. Both of these ways do not necessitate the removing of a bottom plate and then the removal of an SD card. No, instead just insert something into the camera's USB port. Pretty simple. It's 2022. Check your calendars.

This camera is a LInux computer with a lens.
I'm not sure why the lack of removable storage is seen as a drawback. The built in storage is almost certainly faster than SD or CFExpress. And as long as it's simple enough to offload images to a laptop, tablet or phone, it shouldn't be an issue.

I am a bit surprised the internal storage starts at 8GB though. I can't imagine they're selling many (any?) of the base model. I guess it lets them sneak the price under 2500 euro, though.

- K
 
Solid State memory can fail. Anytime that you've had an SD, CF, or PCMCIA memory card fail: easily replaced.

If the internal memory of the Pixii fails, it is not user replaceable.

The M8, M9, and M Monochrom all have USB ports. I've never used them. But- I can transfer images using the port and leave the SD card in place.
 

DeeJayK

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Seattle, WA, USA
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Keith
Solid State memory can fail. Anytime that you've had an SD, CF, or PCMCIA memory card fail: easily replaced.

If the internal memory of the Pixii fails, it is not user replaceable.

The M8, M9, and M Monochrom all have USB ports. I've never used them. But- I can transfer images using the port and leave the SD card in place.
I would expect that a failure of an internal removeable memory card interface would be equally likely as any failure of internal memory. Probably even moreso, since it involves parts physically moving against each other. Such a failure would involve a similarly complex fix which would be outside the scope of most users.

I also would assess the likelihood of either type of failure to be small enough as to not factor into my purchasing decision. YMMV.

- K
 
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Solid State memory can fail. Anytime that you've had an SD, CF, or PCMCIA memory card fail: easily replaced.

If the internal memory of the Pixii fails, it is not user replaceable.

The M8, M9, and M Monochrom all have USB ports. I've never used them. But- I can transfer images using the port and leave the SD card in place.

I have just re-read your post about non user replaceable memory. I am pretty sure that an out of warranty camera can be repaired by most competent camera techs who repair digital. This is just a computer and has no mechanical parts other than the RF. So there should be more internal space, in theory anyway. That would make it easier for camera techs to get to the memory card and replace it. We have seen no reports of what the guts of these cameras are like other than the exploded views on the maker's site. The story is unfolding.
 
I've had Two SD cards fail completely and without warning in the last 10 years. Media recovery failed to get the lost images.

SD readers are fairly simple.

CF cards: I've had bent pins using in computers, have straightened some myself. I've had CF slots custom designed for embedded systems to guarantee alignment. $100 per device.

Some internal memory is soldered to the board- can be replaced, but is more difficult. It would be nice to know how the memory is mounted. If it is socketed, would be easy. I've used both socketed solid-state disk-on-chip with PC104 and soldered with embedded computers. My engineer can replace the latter.
 
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