Places of worship

Aushiker

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May 25, 2015
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Fremantle, Western Australia
Andrew
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The Gargoyles of Church of Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie - PARIS-2018-45 by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

A crop of the gargoyles of the former 16th-century Church of Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie located in the 4th arrondissement of Paris, France, on Rue de Rivoli at Rue Nicolas Flamel.

This 52-metre (171 ft) Flamboyant Gothic tower is all that remains of the former 16th-century Church of Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie ("Saint James of the butchers"), which was demolished in 1797, during the French Revolution, leaving only the tower. What remains of the destroyed church of St. Jacques La Boucherie is now considered a national historic landmark.
 

Aushiker

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May 25, 2015
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Fremantle, Western Australia
Andrew
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St Mabyn Parish Church Tower - UK2016-44 by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

St Mabyn Church is a Grade I listed late 15th-century Church of England parish church in St Mabyn, Cornwall, United Kingdom. The church is dedicated to Saint Mabyn or Mabena, who was regarded in local tradition as one of the many children of Brychan, a Welsh saint and King of Brycheiniog in the 5th century. - Source : Wikipedia - St Mabyn Parish Church - Wikipedia
 

Aushiker

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May 25, 2015
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Fremantle, Western Australia
Andrew
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La Congregation du Saint-Esprit — Interior - PARIS-2018-76 by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

On our Paris Charms & Secrets electric bike tour of Paris we visited a very interesting church which Eric described as being the oldest in Paris. I believe it was the La Congregation du Saint-Esprit but I am not 100% sure.

It was interesting trying to shoot inside the dimly lit church hand-held with a F4.0-5.6 lens.
 

Aushiker

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May 25, 2015
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Fremantle, Western Australia
Andrew
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La Congregation du Saint-Esprit — Sanctuary - PARIS-2018-77 by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

On our Paris Charms & Secrets electric bike tour of Paris we visited a very interesting church which Eric described as being the oldest in Paris. I believe it was the La Congregation du Saint-Esprit but I am not 100% sure.

It was interesting trying to shoot inside the dimly lit church hand-held with a F4.0-5.6 lens.
 

Aushiker

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May 25, 2015
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Fremantle, Western Australia
Andrew
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Église du Collège - Chemin de Stevenson-2018-03 by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

The Église du Collège du Puy-en-Velay is a church of the Catholic faith. The construction of the church commenced in 1604 and was completed in 1635 and remains in use today.

In this parish church one will find the sanctuary of Saint Jean-François Régis, the apostle of Velay and Vivarais, who died in Lalouvesc (in Ardèche) in 1640.

Saint Jean-François Régis from 1636, apparently traveled the mountains of Vivarais and Velay to evangelize its inhabitants. He created a refuge on the Puy for repentant prostitutes, defended lacemakers by getting the Parliament of Toulouse the right to manufacture lace again of which Le Puy-en-Velay is well known for today.

Day 0 of 12 - Le Puy-en-Velay: Walking the Chemin de Stevenson (GR 70 Robert Louis Stevenson Trail) in the south of France.
 

Aushiker

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May 25, 2015
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Fremantle, Western Australia
Andrew
The Cross - Ours - Chemin de Stevenson-2018-17
by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

This cross on the outskirts of the village, Ours is the first one you come across on the GR70 but they become a common sight for quite a few days as you walk through a very Catholic part of France.

Day 1 of 12 - Le Puy-en-Velay: Walking the Chemin de Stevenson (GR 70 Robert Louis Stevenson Trail) in the south of France.
 

Aushiker

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May 25, 2015
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Fremantle, Western Australia
Andrew
Basilica of St Patrick - Fremantle , Western Australia - Roman Catholic Churches - {005}
by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

This photograph continues my social history project documenting both the mundane and the interesting in the City of Fremantle and surrounding areas through the medium of Waymarking.

The Basilica of St Patrick’s Fremantle was established around 1850, the third Catholic Community in Western Australia after St Mary’s Cathedral Parish Perth and the Benedictine community of New Norcia. Till 1894 the parish was served mainly by Diocesan Priests with the exception of the 1850s when it was served by a number of Benedictines who each came for a short time.

Since 1894 the parish has been entrusted to the Missionary Oblates of Mary Immaculate. It was their first foundation in Australia and they have now been responsible for its pastoral care for 102 years.

In respect to why it is a Basilica, Wikipedia and Fremantle Stuff are helpful here. There are four major basilicas, all in Rome, and over 1600 minor basilicas elsewhere, of which this is one. It means that this parish is obliged to fulfil certain liturgical obligations, and: 'It should be sufficiently large and with an ample sanctuary. It should be renowned for history, relics or sacred images, and should be served by a sufficient number of priests and other ministers and by an adequate choir.'

It does not appear to be a heritage listed building which is curious.
 

Aushiker

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May 25, 2015
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Fremantle, Western Australia
Andrew
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Church of Saint Jean - Le Monastier-sur-Gazeille, France - Chemin de Stevenson-2018-D2-01 by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

Whilst Robert Lois Stevenson "spent about a month of fine days" in Le Monastier before setting off on his travels we were not so excited by Le Monastier-sur-Gazeille. Partly I am sure because Anne was badly injured after the first day of walking and so we didn't have much enthusiasm for exploring the village. It was also not helped by arriving on a Sunday, which meant the village was pretty much closed.

All that said, the Church of Saint Jean pretty much marks the start of the official start of the Chemin de Stevenson (GR 70 Robert Louis Stevenson Trail) (Stevenson actually started from the Place de la Poste across the road) but allow me a little poetic licence here.

The church sits high above the valley and provides an imposing view down the valley, where we would be walking.

Day 2 of 12 - Le Monastier-sur-Gazeille to Le Bouchet-Saint-Nicolas: Walking the Chemin de Stevenson (GR 70 Robert Louis Stevenson Trail) in the south of France.
 
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Jim McClain

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Nov 10, 2018
104
Teh REAL Northern California
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Although I went to church a lot when I lived in Greenville, CA (see the previous photo I posted in this thread), that was more or less because it was expected of me as a child. When I came back from Vietnam, I settled in Quincy, CA - same county, but 22 miles apart - and didn't fancy going to church. But my girlfriend and I ran into a couple while shopping one day and we hit it off. It turned out he was the pastor of this Methodist Church. We spent time together as friends, but only rarely as members of the congregation.

Years later, I would begin to spend many Friday evenings in one of the rooms of the social hall behind this church, where I attended AA meetings. Several pastors have come and gone, as have girlfriends, but I keep coming back to this church. They serve the community in a variety of ways, so my trips there haven't always been through the front doors.

It was about 4 years ago that I stood down the street a few blocks and marveled at what the late Fall had brought to the church. I just happened to have my camera and tripod with me and captured this single shot before cars began to park in front for some service or event. In fact, a woman was walking in front, where my signature is now and there was a couple of construction cones in the shot. It's funny that I didn't even notice the power lines and cables - 5 or 6 of them - draped across the front of the building until I got home and looked at the photo on my computer. I also saw the building was in desperate need of paint and the steeple needed repairs from all the Woodpecker damage.

This was one of my first big challenges in Lightroom and Photoshop, well beyond just basic editing. I wanted to show my vision, which was quite different than reality, but I wanted it to look real too. So, I removed the lines and cables, the construction cones and even the woman walking into the frame. I "fixed" the woodpecker damage some and brightened up the paint a little. I spent hours on it and I have re-edited it several times since. It got a second place ribbon at the county fair and lots of likes on facebook. Then people contacted me about buying it. Most, of course, didn't want to pay what I asked (usually $100 for an 8x12 framed print). They didn't want it that bad. Then I let it be known I would sell it for just the cost of printing and framing, plus an amount of their own choosing to be donated to a local charity. I sold 2 that way, one for a 20.00 donation and another for a 100.00 donation. I was very happy about that, even if the money went to the local crisis center. Then a lady called and asked me to deliver a framed photo to her office, which was the pastor's office of that church. I explained the deal, gave her several charities to choose from and like the others, she wrote 2 checks, one for the cost of printing and the frame and one more to the local crisis center - for $1,000.00. Wow.

I don't think the photo is all that great. I see the flaws, but am so happy that others liked it so much. That's prob'ly more than you wanted to know about this photo, but I felt like writing about it.
 

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