Fuji Raw conversion software vs. Aperture

winginkris

Veteran
I've been using aperture to do my RAW file conversions but often see that others are using other software such as Silkypix THEN moving the file to Aperture or Photoshop to do the finishing touches. I don't like to do a lot of post processing, but I do want to get the best image I can. Is there an advantage to taking this extra step?
If anyone could shed a little light, I'd appreciate it.
 

Grant

Veteran
First I suggest stick with what you know unless there is a burning desire to change. Often the tool you have the most knowledge is the tool that will work best for you. That being said I use a number of tools. If I am only working on the web or working with small prints Aperture is as good as it gets. If I am printing large I tend to use photoshop as well. In fact I almost exclusively use photoshop for my large final prints.

This works for me but it may not work for you.
 

winginkris

Veteran
Thanks Grant. I'm very comfortable with Aperture, however I do want to make larger prints and I guess I am just wondering if a different kind of conversion software works better than another. I.E. Silkypix. Photoshop is too expensive for me and it does WAY more than I'd ever need. I don't want to do a lot of post processing, just some minor tweeks to get it to look good to me, but I also need it to look good when enlarged. I also use Topaz Dnoise which works very well and also SilverEfx Pro for b'w's.
I guess what I'm asking is if there's an advantage to using a seperate RAW converter first and if so, what are the advantages.
Thanks again for your reply.
 

adanac

Veteran
Location
Vancouver, BC
Mac OS X folks might want to try Raw Photo Processor if you want to have a look at how a different raw developer treats your files. It is free; on the GXR I find that at times it betters Lightroom 4 (which is an improvement over Lightroom 3 for my use) in lifting detail out of shadows, although I think as of LR4 the difference is now smaller.

A small donation unlocks some additional features but you'll be able to tell if it is worth it before then.
 

Grant

Veteran
Winginkris

If I am printing large I do all my work in Photoshop. When I send my prints to my printer I send them as Tiff at the right colour balance to match my printer and at the exact size it is to be printed. So if I am making an 11 x 14 print I can specify those exact dimensions at 300 dpi when I crop the image, and my printer doesn't have to second guess but simply print the image as it is and it will be perfect. I really hate to let the person print my images make decisions I may not like. You don't have to go the expense of Photoshop as Elements will get you there if you are on a budget.
 

winginkris

Veteran
Thanks again Grant. I think for now I'll just stick with using Aperture as I'm not hearing that a separate RAW converter is any better. I don't do my own printing, but have had a few printed from outside sources with mixed results. Oddly enough the color prints seem to come out fine, but the black and whites seem to be off. This may be more from my monitor being off as much as anything else(myself included)! It seems the simpler I keep things, the better off I am in the end. Thanks again, Grant
 

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