Stroll Seen while strolling...walking and wandering outside

wee-pics

Hall of Famer
Location
Germany
Real Name
Walter
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wee-pics

Hall of Famer
Location
Germany
Real Name
Walter
That is just amazing how many of those words I recognise in my own dialect.
That's not surprising if you grew up in the so-called Celtic fringe. Scottish and Irish Gaelic as well as the Breton spoken in Bretagne by the old people are sort of dialects of one language. Cornish belonged to the same group but died out some one hundred years ago.

During my holidays in the Bretagne years ago I spent a few days in a B'n'B of a nice elderly lady who gave me a few lessons in her own language (Breton) at breakfast seeing I was interested.

You can see the similarities in lots of place names: right in the west - north of Brest - there is the mouth of a small river called "Aber Wrach", the same word is in Aberdeen, which is the mouth of the river Dee.
 

Bart J D

All-Pro
That's not surprising if you grew up in the so-called Celtic fringe. Scottish and Irish Gaelic as well as the Breton spoken in Bretagne by the old people are sort of dialects of one language. Cornish belonged to the same group but died out some one hundred years ago.

During my holidays in the Bretagne years ago I spent a few days in a B'n'B of a nice elderly lady who gave me a few lessons in her own language (Breton) at breakfast seeing I was interested.

You can see the similarities in lots of place names: right in the west - north of Brest - there is the mouth of a small river called "Aber Wrach", the same word is in Aberdeen, which is the mouth of the river Dee.
Almost. The Celtic influence is supposed to be found only in the coastal dialect of Flanders but I suppose that in its turn has influenced the language of the area I grew up in. Just some 40 - 50 Km more to the East.
At least I can understand a good part of what the people from the coast are saying, provided they still use their native dialect.
Getting more and more rare in the last generation.
Unfortunately, most of the current generation is speaking a kind of in-between language, neither standard Dutch - which is as good as a foreign language to us - nor their own dialect.
And then there are the diehards of course who just keep speaking their own dialect defying anyone to say they don't understand them :)
 

theoldsmithy

Hall of Famer
Location
Cheshire, England
Real Name
Martin Connolly
That's not surprising if you grew up in the so-called Celtic fringe. Scottish and Irish Gaelic as well as the Breton spoken in Bretagne by the old people are sort of dialects of one language. Cornish belonged to the same group but died out some one hundred years ago.

During my holidays in the Bretagne years ago I spent a few days in a B'n'B of a nice elderly lady who gave me a few lessons in her own language (Breton) at breakfast seeing I was interested.

You can see the similarities in lots of place names: right in the west - north of Brest - there is the mouth of a small river called "Aber Wrach", the same word is in Aberdeen, which is the mouth of the river Dee.
Cornish has been revived in the last 100 years. It's not widely spoken but it's certainly not dead. Aber also means 'mouth of a river' in Welsh, and is in many place names.
 
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