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Aushiker

Hall of Famer
May 25, 2015
Fremantle, Western Australia
Andrew
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St John's Anglican Church, Fremantle - Anglican and Episcopal Churches by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

This photograph continues my social history project documenting both the mundane and the interesting in the City of Fremantle and surrounding areas through the medium of Waymarking.

St John's Anglican Church also known as St John the Evangelist Church, is an Anglican church in Fremantle, Western Australia. It was originally opened in 1843, and then replaced with a larger building in 1882. The older building was demolished, which allowed Fremantle Town Hall to be built and for the High Street to be extended, giving the Kings Square its current shape.
 

Aushiker

Hall of Famer
May 25, 2015
Fremantle, Western Australia
Andrew
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Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel - PARIS-2018-73 by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel is a triumphal arch in Paris, located in the Place du Carrousel. It is an example of Corinthian style architecture. It was built between 1806 and 1808 to commemorate Napoleon's military victories of the previous year.

Looking west [the view in this photograph], the arch is aligned with the Luxor Obelisk in the Place de la Concorde, the centerline of the grand boulevard Champs-Élysées, the Arc de Triomphe at the Place de l'Étoile, and, although it is not directly visible from the Place du Carrousel, the Grande Arche de la Défense.
 

Aushiker

Hall of Famer
May 25, 2015
Fremantle, Western Australia
Andrew
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Panthéon - PARIS-2018-78 by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

On our Paris Charms & Secrets electric bike tour of Paris we visited the Panthéon where recently Simone Veil was buried (along with her husband Antonine Veil as a mark of respect).

It was originally built as a church dedicated to St. Genevieve and to house the reliquary châsse containing her relics but, after many changes, now functions as a secular mausoleum containing the remains of distinguished French citizens.

By burying its great people in the Panthéon, the French nation acknowledges the honour it received from them. As such, interment here is severely restricted and is allowed only by a parliamentary act for "National Heroes.”
 

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