Fuji Should I sell my X-T1?

kevistopheles

Top Veteran
Oct 18, 2014
103
A agree with Luke, I almost never post a SOOC image. Images are not representations of life, they are our interpretations of what we see. Working an image in post is a time honored tradition. Ansel Adams always worked his images (sometimes quite a bit) in developing to get exactly the look he wanted.
 

rbelyell

All-Pro
May 14, 2013
88
NY Mtns
RAW images often require post processing. the xtrans sensor is contraversial, some like it, many dont. regardless, xtrans requires more PP, especially in RAW than the bayer sensor fuji used in the original x100. as far as i'm concerned, that is a fact and is not debatable any longer. just this week Adobe admitted it STILL hasnt gotten the xtrans interpretation correct!

sony A or RX series are certainly sharper OOC, so if thats all you want, then maybe itll work for you. however, they too require RAW PP because the images are somewhat flat and desaturated OOC. remember RAW=PP!

these cameras require both knowledge of how cameras work and PP for RAW files. period. if one, the other, or both trouble you, then you will waste your time with either fuji xtrans or sony A or RX series. my recommedation is get an original fuji x100 and enjoy the results while, if necessary, you learn how to properly use the manual functions necessary to get the best out of more advanced equipment. with the x100's bayer sensor you can shoot RAW, jpeg or any combo, with minimal to no PP. at the same time, it can be operated on 'auto' to great effect, and/or you can experiment with manual controls.
 

stingx

Regular
Feb 12, 2015
13
Funny...I sold off my A7 + glass for the X-T1 after enjoying my X-E1 so much. Full frame or not, I truly believe Fuji takes better pics and requires less of my time in post. My opinion, of course, but switching to Sony isn't going to help you one bit.
 

Hyubie

Top Veteran
Jun 8, 2011
103
Massachusetts
If you don't want to PP much and prefer JPEGs, I found you can do no better than using the Fuji JPEGs. I have been using only JPGs ever since I owned a Fuji, and rarely got disappointed. But as others pointed out, I still do some tweaks on it, and more often than not I found the Fuji JPEGs can handle the tweaks I want.
 

Biro

Super Moderator
Aug 7, 2011
124
Jersey Shore
Steve
Here's something I'd like to know from the OP: Was he pleased with the results from the E-PL1? If so, and given his stated preference for as little post-processing as possible, selling the X-T1 and picking up an E-M5 or E-M10 might be the way to go. But it's clear there is much one can do with the output of any Fuji X camera if one is willing to spend some time changing settings and doing PP.

But learning more about the fundamentals of photography would be the best route of all. Either way, once the OP starts seeing better results, he might become a much more active photographer and forum member.
 

bobmielke

Regular
Aug 25, 2013
18
Portland, Oregon USA
Dear Users,

I'm not a very active member (nor a very active photographer) but I wanted to seek your opinion on a matter that has been bothering me for a while. I've owned only two real cameras in my life. Olympus E-PL1 and Fuji X-T1. I definitely have a lot to learn when it comes to photography, but... I've been thinking... should I sell my X-T1? I've never taken a single picture I'd be happy with with this camera. I love its design, I love the way it feels, the way it looks, I love the knobs... but for some reason all of the pictures I've taken with X-T1 are either not sharp enough or lack the colors I see in other people's pics... I was thinking of selling my X-T1 and going after a full-frame Sony A7 II.

I'd be happy to upload some of those pics and wait for your criticism, but it really drives me crazy that I haven't taken even one good picture with my X-T1, despite the fact that I've had it for a year.

Cheers
 

bobmielke

Regular
Aug 25, 2013
18
Portland, Oregon USA
If you don't want to PP much and prefer JPEGs, I found you can do no better than using the Fuji JPEGs. I have been using only JPGs ever since I owned a Fuji, and rarely got disappointed. But as others pointed out, I still do some tweaks on it, and more often than not I found the Fuji JPEGs can handle the tweaks I want.
Offering $5. Hey, it's used. LOL
 

Stephen S

Veteran
Feb 14, 2014
68
East Bay, Northern California
Stephen Scharf
If you can't get good images from a compact camera or point and shoot you won't get them from a larger camera, unless all you're looking for is resolution/sharpness, shallow DOF and bokeh but photography is far more than that. Ever heard that a Montblanc Meisterstück with a 24k gold nib or the latest text processor made someone a better writer?


Each and every image can benefit from a little PP and I'm not talking about excessive manipulations in Photoshop. If in doubt ask the masters like Ansel Adams.
Except that Ansel Adams is dead, so you can't ask him. But I do agree with you that every image needs some sharpening and a little work in post.
 

mesmerized

Regular
Mar 26, 2014
8
Howdy,
I've been away for quite a while... Sorry about that and thank you for each and every post. I'd like to upload a few pictues to show you what I'm talking about. Unfortunately, these are not the pictures I originally intended to upload but here we go anyway.

1) The person's face doesn't seem to be as sharp as I'd like it to be. He wasn't moving.

Camera make :
FUJIFILM
Camera model :
X-T1
Date/Time :
2015/04/24 11:04:39
Resolution :
3264 x 4896
Flash used :
No
Focal length :
55.0mm (35mm equivalent 83mm)
CCD width :
23.40mm
Exposure time :
0.0020 s (1/500)
Aperture :
f/4.0
ISO equiv. :
200
Whitebalance :
Auto
Metering Mode :
pattern
Exposure :
Manual
Exposure Mode :
Manual



2) Same here. His face doesn't look as sharp as I'd expect.

Camera make :
FUJIFILM
Camera model :
X-T1
Date/Time :
2015/04/24 11:06:59
Resolution :
4896 x 3264
Flash used :
No
Focal length :
39.0mm (35mm equivalent 59mm)
CCD width :
23.40mm
Exposure time :
0.0016 s (1/640)
Aperture :
f/4.0
ISO equiv. :
200
Whitebalance :
Auto
Metering Mode :
pattern
Exposure :
Manual
Exposure Mode :
Manual



Some of the pictures are intedned to upload seem to have this odd kind of "fogginess" about them. I don't know how to explain it or describe it... Imagine looking at something through a piece of very thin glass that doesn't seem to be perfectly crystal clear.

I don't know. Maybe I'm just imagining things.
 

Lightmancer

Super Moderator
Aug 13, 2011
164
Sunny Frimley
Bill Palmer
Well, I need to look at these full sized on a big screen, but the obvious question is what are you focussing on? Are you relying upon the camera to, for instance, do face recognition or are you focussing and recomposing?
 

KillRamsey

Super Moderator
Jun 20, 2012
124
Hood River, OR
Kyle
(Like Bill) I'd need to see a 100% crop of the faces to see any potential softness, but at web-size they look perfectly sharp to me. I might've exposed the second one about 1/3 of a stop brighter because his face is in a bit of a shadow, but it's pretty crisp at web-size.

Question: What is your sharpness set to in-camera? I think I normally use +1 for my jpg's.
 

mesmerized

Regular
Mar 26, 2014
8
(Like Bill) I'd need to see a 100% crop of the faces to see any potential softness, but at web-size they look perfectly sharp to me. I might've exposed the second one about 1/3 of a stop brighter because his face is in a bit of a shadow, but it's pretty crisp at web-size.

Question: What is your sharpness set to in-camera? I think I normally use +1 for my jpg's.
Thanks

It's set on 0.

When you say that you'd have exposed the second one about 1/3 of a stop brighter, would you do it by adjusting the shutter speed ot the aperture?

Where can I upload pics so that you guys could see them in full size?
 

mesmerized

Regular
Mar 26, 2014
8
I wish I could recall that. Those pics were taken such a long time ago... I suppose I focused on the kid's face. I mean, the green square was right on his face (in both cases)
 

Lightmancer

Super Moderator
Aug 13, 2011
164
Sunny Frimley
Bill Palmer
So did you focus and recompose? If so, did you shift your plane of focus in doing so, or did you inadvertently ease the pressure on the shutter? Technique is important.

Having said that, I have now looked at both images on a larger monitor and can't see much wrong with them.

If you can't remember how you focussed, please can you shoot something new this weekend and let us see that? It's very hard to diagnose without all the facts!
 

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