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lucien

Legend
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Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
Thanks to @MountainMan79 and @Brownie for the corrections, it was indeed a Great Egret.
On the same walk, I saw a number of snow geese hanging out with the more common (in southern Oregon, at least) Canada geese--

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When I got a bit nearer to them, the snow geese took to the air but the Canada geese stayed put.

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The snow geese flew off...

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And I watched them go...

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But eventually they returned to earth and resumed their foraging along with their Canadian relatives.

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John King

Member of SOFA
Location
Beaumaris, Melbourne, Australia
Name
John ...
One more from Emigrant Lake in Ashland - this one of a great egret 'fishing'--

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Miguel, something terrible is happening to your last few images you've posted :( . At full size, they have large grains all over them that just shouldn't be there at ISO 800 in daylight. It's really quite weird.
 

L0n3Gr3yW0lf

Veteran
Location
Somerset, UK
Name
Ovi
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Finally found myself shooting my favourite local bird: The Long-Tail Tit ... I haven't shot birds and this bird in a very long time, though I was late to get to the location and I had very little time to do it, about 25 minutes. And you will notice my current frustration as well: out of focus. I decided to keep the picture because there aren't many that I got and it does have more emotional value for me.

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And again, my Sony A7R II does not work particularly well as a wildlife camera, not just in speed but also in accuracy. I am looking into, and possibly very soon, trading in with a Sony a9 Mark I.

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"Heuou there" While I will miss the absolute wonder of cropping power of 42 Megapickle Ricks I think I will "survive" (and my laptop will give me hugs and kisses not having to deal with so much data) with 24 Megapickle Ricks.

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I know that it's very punishing for any camera to autofocus on the strong backlight, as the sun was getting very low on the far right side of the frame, illuminating the vegetation like Christmas lights, my Sony a7R II has not captured ONE single image (out of about 50) in pin-sharp focus.

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Alas, my consideration for Sony a9 is also a business decision as I am practising and preparing myself to do professional pet portrait photography next year (possibly start of the summer) with a focus on action and playing outdoors (I don't have the space or budget for a studio yet).
 
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
Miguel, something terrible is happening to your last few images you've posted :( . At full size, they have large grains all over them that just shouldn't be there at ISO 800 in daylight. It's really quite weird.

Alas, there is a prosaic explanation for the graininess: this is what happens when you a) try to blow up an extremely tiny section of a larger photo (because, alas, you were so far away from your avian subjects that in the original digital negative, they were rather tiny in the frame), and, after realizing that the photo was slightly out of focus to begin with, you subsequently b) attempt to use the generally excellent Topaz Sharpen plug-in to make the resulting photo a bit sharper.

Moral of story: Robert Capa was right when he said words to the effect that if your photo's not good enough, you're not close enough ;)
 
Alas, there is a prosaic explanation for the graininess: this is what happens when you a) try to blow up an extremely tiny section of a larger photo (because, alas, you were so far away from your avian subjects that in the original digital negative, they were rather tiny in the frame), and, after realizing that the photo was slightly out of focus to begin with, you subsequently b) attempt to use the generally excellent Topaz Sharpen plug-in to make the resulting photo a bit sharper.
Topaz Sharpen is like wah-wah: it's really easy to use too much!
Moral of story: Robert Capa was right when he said words to the effect that if your photo's not good enough, you're not close enough ;)
That's why I got the 150-600 zoom! 😸
 
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