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grebeman

Old Codgers Group
He was a bit exposed and I was fearful for him. I wasn't sure whether to move him to some undergrowth - I didn't. Should I have?
That's always a difficult decision to make. Normally when young fledge (leave the nest) they end up near the nest in cover and the adults usually know where they are. The young will call and reveal their position to the adults if they think they've lost touch. My approach would have been to stand back and wait. I'd have been listening for the youngster to call and whether an adult responded by approaching the youngster, hopefully with food. Having seen the direction that the adult came from I might have been tempted to move the youngster towards that position if there was cover there. There's always the possibility of moving the youngster further away from the adults territory when it's out in the open such as that one is. The worst thing to do is to take the youngster away in the hope that you can offer it some form of support unless you have experience in that area or know someone who does. I know a person who has raised half grown Kingfishers to a position where they were able to fish for themselves and be successfully released, he is a ringer and put rings on them and had returns indicating they'd survived, but people like that are very rare. The other approach might have been to search round the area and try and find other young, but that assumes they've all fledged and that one is not a singleton that has fledged before the others. Not easy but always best to hope that the adults can sort the situation out with minimal intervention on your part.

Looking at that bird in particular I'm not sure that its primary wing feathers have developed enough to enable to fly and lift itself off the ground. I think it might only be able to fly in a downward direction which is why it's landed where it is. In the great scheme of things doubtless that happens to other individuals that we never see, but every individual we can help in those circumstances is a boost to the population and our own feel good nature.

Barrie
 

hannahntilly

Regular
Apr 13, 2012
104
Surrey, UK
That's always a difficult decision to make. Normally when young fledge (leave the nest) they end up near the nest in cover and the adults usually know where they are. The young will call and reveal their position to the adults if they think they've lost touch. My approach would have been to stand back and wait. I'd have been listening for the youngster to call and whether an adult responded by approaching the youngster, hopefully with food. Having seen the direction that the adult came from I might have been tempted to move the youngster towards that position if there was cover there. There's always the possibility of moving the youngster further away from the adults territory when it's out in the open such as that one is. The worst thing to do is to take the youngster away in the hope that you can offer it some form of support unless you have experience in that area or know someone who does. I know a person who has raised half grown Kingfishers to a position where they were able to fish for themselves and be successfully released, he is a ringer and put rings on them and had returns indicating they'd survived, but people like that are very rare. The other approach might have been to search round the area and try and find other young, but that assumes they've all fledged and that one is not a singleton that has fledged before the others. Not easy but always best to hope that the adults can sort the situation out with minimal intervention on your part.

Looking at that bird in particular I'm not sure that its primary wing feathers have developed enough to enable to fly and lift itself off the ground. I think it might only be able to fly in a downward direction which is why it's landed where it is. In the great scheme of things doubtless that happens to other individuals that we never see, but every individual we can help in those circumstances is a boost to the population and our own feel good nature.

Barrie
Many thanks for the advice.
 

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