Show Clouds Sunrise/Sunset

A couple of shots from the Cronulla area in the southern suburbs of Sydney.

Sunset from Hungry Point
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Sunset from Hungry Point by peterb666, on Flickr

Although it doesn't look it, this was taken 20 minutes later and is facing the opposite direction (i.e. 180 degrees away from the setting sun). This is Oak Park Rock Pool (otherwise known as Glaisher Point)
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Oak Park - Glaisher Point-1 by peterb666, on Flickr

Both shots taken with a Nikon D90 and 10-24mm zoom. The first at 24mm and the second at 10mm.
 
I went back out to Oak Park Rock Pool this morning with a friend. It was mainly an exercise in me showing her how to use filters, particularly grads and tricks like using 2 hard transition grads to simulate a reverse grad. I only shot a small number of photos myself and unfortunately the cloud cover did not oblige for a great sunrise.

In these conditions, the Olympus E-P1 and Olympus M.Zuiko 9-18mm zoom excels. Alas, I had my Nikon D90 and the 10-24mm zoom which struggles with flare. It is fairly well controlled in this shot (actually the Nikon lens has a very good reputation for flare resistance - it just isn't as good as the Olympus lens). Where the Nikon excels is noise control. I don't have to do any post-processing fiddling with noise at all with the Nikon and I never have to use long-exposure noise removal at all. Here is the shot...


Sunrise at Oak Park by peterb666, on Flickr
 

BBW

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 7, 2010
betwixt and between
BB
Thanks for both posts, Peter. You know I'm a big fan of your water photos...and enjoy hearing your descriptions about what goes on during the process. I do like the simplicity of your last shot very much and the 16 x 9 works just perfectly.
 
Thanks BB - I always appreciate your feedback. The ratio is actually much wider than 16:9, it is 1:2.66 which is one of my favourites and suits the ultrawide format well. The ratio comes from Cinerama and Cinemascope films when they re-released on the old Super-8 films (typically around 2:85 and 2:33 to 1 initially). I find the old cine film ratios nice to work with when you have limited interest in the foreground or beyond the horizon.
 
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The clouds are from the steam where the water is hitting the fresh volcanic flow. You can see a red glow in the clouds near the left edge of the picture. The bright spot on the right is the rising sun.
I love that shot Deirdre. We don't have anything like that in our part of the world and to see the smoke/steam rising out of the water must be great. Nice balance to the shot.
 

BBW

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 7, 2010
betwixt and between
BB
Peter, is this 1:2.66 something that any of us can do in say Lightroom? I hate to add it in if it won't work because I haven't found a way to delete a size ratio yet and I have one that is completely useless that I added inadvertently.:redface:
 

BBW

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 7, 2010
betwixt and between
BB
Deidre, somehow I missed your latest! We must have been posting at similar times. Gosh it must have been so amazing to be out there! What's the sea life like around these volcanoes? And by the way, did you go scuba diving while you were out there?
 
I normally do my cropping in Camera Raw before exporting to CS5. In camera Raw, you drag the crop frame over the image, right click on the crop frame and choose custom then enter any ratio you want, e.g. 1 and 2.66. If it doesn't appear how you like it, just clic outside the image and start again. Your custom ratio will be remembered.

Better still, once the custom ratio is set, use the straigten tool and it will automatically apply a crop the whole width possible, then reposition and resize the crop as required.

I find this better than using CS5 as if are not careful how you enter the details in CS5, your image will be resampled to a different resolution.

P.S. I didn't take to Lightroom after trying the Beta version of 3. Camera Raw is easier for me as I find it more intuitive.
 
One last shot from Oak Park from yesterday morning. This one is the first I took in the series and is pre-sunrise. I couldn't decide how to work this one as there was a single bright star in the sky and wanted to keep it. The star was perfectly reflected in the water. Only problem, with so little going on in the sky, it meant too much empty space so the star in the sky got cropped out and the reflection removed.

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Pre-sunrise at Oak Park by peterb666, on Flickr

If you compare it to the previous shot - notice pre-footprints too! Play spot the dust bunny (knew I forgot something)
 

tanngrisnir3

Regular
Nov 11, 2010
Got to scroll up a bit to see the moon. Lovely colours.
Thanks! I know, it's sort of large, so the scroll-down bit is somewhat irksome.

Say, does it look to you like the building on the right (what's known as Century City) are leaning about, oh, 7 degrees to the left?

Strong winds here on the edge of the Western World.
 

tanngrisnir3

Regular
Nov 11, 2010
One last shot from Oak Park from yesterday morning. This one is the first I took in the series and is pre-sunrise. I couldn't decide how to work this one as there was a single bright star in the sky and wanted to keep it. The star was perfectly reflected in the water. Only problem, with so little going on in the sky, it meant too much empty space so the star in the sky got cropped out and the reflection removed.

Subscribe to see EXIF info for this image (if available)

Pre-sunrise at Oak Park by peterb666, on Flickr

If you compare it to the previous shot - notice pre-footprints too! Play spot the dust bunny (knew I forgot something)
Owch! I know about dust spots, esp. once one's arrived back home with thoughts of how perfect the shots just taken are going to be.

Lovely shot, though. How wide an angle was that?
 
Say, does it look to you like the building on the right (what's known as Century City) are leaning about, oh, 7 degrees to the left?
Yep, but I didn't mention it because I am an old leftie at heart.

If you are using Adobe Camera Raw, it is easy enough to correct that with the lens correction sliders. If you are going to go back and re-do it, I would have a think about pulling the moon down a bit in the sky so you can crop off the top. I think it is pretty good as it is.

Cheers

PeterB666
 

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