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Very nice, I really like this shot. If there were one thing I'd critique, it would be the appearance, or maybe illusion, that the right side is just ever so slightly higher. Perhaps it isn't, it's hard to tell on my laptop monitor. Of course it could be the way the shoreline falls away from you on the right side that creates the appearance of it being just a touch unlevel. Or it could be that fall I took awhile back. Nevertheless, great image. Super!
 
Very nice, I really like this shot. If there were one thing I'd critique, it would be the appearance, or maybe illusion, that the right side is just ever so slightly higher. Perhaps it isn't, it's hard to tell on my laptop monitor. Of course it could be the way the shoreline falls away from you on the right side that creates the appearance of it being just a touch unlevel. Or it could be that fall I took awhile back. Nevertheless, great image. Super!
Always a problem with inland waterways, Will. I've seen the same effect in some of my own photos. The photo is accurate, but looks wrong. Our brains tell us that water should be level.

Well, after the age of about 7 y.o., anyway. There are some interesting psychological studies of this stage of development of our brains, and around 7 y.o. is a critical development stage.
 
Very nice, I really like this shot. If there were one thing I'd critique, it would be the appearance, or maybe illusion, that the right side is just ever so slightly higher. Perhaps it isn't, it's hard to tell on my laptop monitor. Of course it could be the way the shoreline falls away from you on the right side that creates the appearance of it being just a touch unlevel. Or it could be that fall I took awhile back. Nevertheless, great image. Super!
Thanks for your response.
I'm always very careful when editing photos with horizons in and especially water levels, for as you say, a sloping one can be disconcerting.

Regarding the above photo, I've just checked it again in Affinity, with grid lines applied and I reckon it's approx, 1 to 2 mm higher on one side, which would probably account for less than 1 degree. So, I'll take it that it's maybe more of an optical illusion.

For what it's worth, I once got caught in an argument over on mu43 forum over my suggestion that a similar photo wasn't level. After applying the grid lines it was obvious that it was quite out, but for some reason I got shot down by quite a few members insisting it was level.

So, it's obviously all in the eye of the beholder.
I'm glad you liked the photo anyway. :D
 
After applying the grid lines it was obvious that it was quite out, but for some reason I got shot down by quite a few members insisting it was level.

So, it's obviously all in the eye of the beholder.
Indeed the eye can fool. I go by the plane of the water body. It doesn't lie. e.g. a shoreline that approaches the viewer may be perceived as a horizontal when in fact it is a converging line. I think that's what's going on in your photo. Then there is lens distortion that may "curve" the horizon. Especially problematic when stitching. The horizon may end up "bumpy". That's why I like hugin. You can grab and try to pull things straight even if the straighten tool doesn't get it right.
 
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