Show "Signs"

rmc50

Veteran
Location
New Zealand
Real Name
Robin
PN10022.jpg

Mightn't be too long before the sign itself requires the attention of the mower.
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
I understand the need of rules, and signs giving the message, but I think here has reached the limit. Two-way walking and cycling path, really 😳

View attachment 256402
I'm not laughing at the shot (nice one!) - but at your idea that this might be overdone. That's way less than what you'll experience around here ... I'll provide proof eventually (in fact, I snapped an image today that should do it, but it has technical issues - I need to re-shoot it).

M.
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
I understand the need of rules, and signs giving the message, but I think here has reached the limit. Two-way walking and cycling path, really 😳

View attachment 256402
I'm not laughing at the shot (nice one!) - but at your idea that this might be overdone. That's way less than what you'll experience around here ... I'll provide proof eventually (in fact, I snapped an image today that should do it, but it has technical issues - I need to re-shoot it).

M.
Follow-up:

L2624067.jpg


Include explanations, guiding lines, barriers ... Switzerland's signs can be "explicit" ...

M.
 
Follow-up:

View attachment 257161

Include explanations, guiding lines, barriers ... Switzerland's signs can be "explicit" ...

M.
Ok, but this I understand and appreciate. The location seems hard to judge when riding a bike which way securely to go. In my example there’s really no need to point two-way cycling/walking path and the path itself goes in front of chapel 🙄
 

Aushiker

Hall of Famer
Location
Fremantle, Western Australia
Real Name
Andrew
51142207890_8879873440_h.jpg

Paynesville Cemetery, Western Australia
by Andrew Priest, on Flickr

Paynesville Cemetery is located approximately 77km East of Mount Magnet. There are only five burials in the cemetery and one headstone.

Gold was discovered in this area in early 1898 by Tom Payne and Arthur Waldeck, and by April 1898 the place had been inspected by a surveyor and a plan of subdivision prepared. It was at first referred to as ‘Paynton’, and ‘East Mount Magnet’ and some records record the locality as “Fords” after another prospector.

By April 1899 local prospectors were using the name Paynesville, and it was with this name that the townsite was gazetted in 1900. It is believed to be named after Tom Payne. The railway from Mount Magnet to Black Range, passing through Paynesville, was opened in 1910.
 

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