Single In Single in January (SiJ) 2021: discussion

mike3996

Hall of Famer
Location
Finland
You're talking used - so I don't know. Having owned the GX85 before the GX9, I'll stick to what I've said.

M.
Fair enough, you scope the battle within new purchases. A reasonable rule. :)

By the way. As a fun fact, GX9 was never distributed to Finland. The major camera retailers stock GX80 in both colors but absolutely no-one stocks GX9 and never has stocked it when I've been browsing.
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
GX9 is hard to come by in the used markets, at least in Finland. Whatever the good market value for the GX9 is, can it beat the ongoing rate of 250 € of GX80/85? :hmmm:

I think it's quite similar over here on this side of the Atlantic, Mike. Used GX85 bodies tend to sell for somewhere between $ 250 to 350 dollars (for context, 250 € = approx $300) - and there are generally quite a few of them available. There are far less used GX9's around - and they tend to go for between $ 400 - 500 and even higher. Of course, GX7's can be found for significantly less, between $ 150 - 200, and in spite of their older sensors, they are still very capable cameras.
 

theoldsmithy

Hall of Famer
Location
Cheshire, England
Real Name
Martin Connolly
You know, Miguel, something about this is profoundly funny to me that I'll explain in a minute - but I *actually* have something to add to my prior mumblings about the camera, and now that you detail your impressions, I think I dare to share it: Over the last couple of weeks, I tried to find anything, just about anything in the entire market that could replace it, and - there's virtually nothing, maybe except the Pen-F, but I find that camera pretty expensive for what it is (after all, it doesn't offer any decisive advantages over something like a E-M10 IV by now), and as you say, the GX9 works fantastically well with the 15mm. Not even Fuji does anything superior - and that's been made clear by the arrival of the X-E4. All in all, apart from sort of cross-grading by picking up a E-M10 IV instead, there's nothing I could do. And that wouldn't tick the rangefinder style box ... So, my search ended with nothing to show. I *could* go for a Sony A6100, but nah ... for all its virtues, it'd feel like a downgrade (I still own the A6000, I know that type of camera).

However, now for the more interesting - if somewhat predicatable - part: Another thing a SiJ does is make you very familiar with your chosen kit - this has been one of the key purposes of the format for a while now, and one many of us have exploited.

The funny thing is: Now that the challenge is drawing to a close, I'm mostly comfortable with the GX9 (again?) - the struggles and all the fighting with what the camera is were definitely worth it. Yes, the niggles remain, but they're just that: niggles.

That said, I'm not sure it'll stay with me long term - but since there's currently nothing to replace it with in a meaningful manner, I'll keep it for the foreseeable future.

The bottom line: We all know, but seldom consider, that comparison is the death of appreciation. If you just use the GX9, it's a very competent, well built camera with a great set of features, period. And, as many of you have pointed out so accurately, of course(!) it can be enjoyed, and also tailored to one's tastes.

Enjoy the camera - I fully agree with what Andrew said in the "GAS" thread: This is the best value in :mu43: right now, at least if you buy new.

M.
As another GX9 user, I tend to agree. I get itchy feet with cameras very quickly, so the few minor irritations with the GX9 would usually have me hunting around for a replacement. But as you say Matt, what would I replace it with? Funds are limited with my son’s wedding (hopefully) coming up this summer, and a holiday in Scotland, so I’d need to get something for the same sort of money - and there just isn’t anything around that would be better. Besides, when I look at the quality of images that the GX9 produces, especially with the 14mm lens, I’m really impressed. Notwithstanding all that, once the SiJ is over I’ll pick up my E-M1 again and give that a good workout.
 

William Lewis

Veteran
Location
Hayward WI
Real Name
William Lewis
LOL . . . an apt description for myself as well. Trying to curb that in 2021.
I was like that for a long time. Go look up my posts at Rangefinder Forum - I may have changed cameras more often than socks some weeks ;)

Then I had m4/3 from 2011 to 2019 with a E-PL1 and a P3 during that time. Now I've changed to Nikon but I intend to stick with it. The only changes I foresee are a Nikon FX body eventually and I'd like a Leica M 240 when a small inheritance comes later this year because there are somethings I like a rangefinder better than an dslr for.
 
Last edited:
Location
Boston Burbs
Real Name
David
You know, Miguel, something about this is profoundly funny to me that I'll explain in a minute - but I *actually* have something to add to my prior mumblings about the camera, and now that you detail your impressions, I think I dare to share it: Over the last couple of weeks, I tried to find anything, just about anything in the entire market that could replace it, and - there's virtually nothing, maybe except the Pen-F, but I find that camera pretty expensive for what it is (after all, it doesn't offer any decisive advantages over something like a E-M10 IV by now), and as you say, the GX9 works fantastically well with the 15mm. Not even Fuji does anything superior - and that's been made clear by the arrival of the X-E4. All in all, apart from sort of cross-grading by picking up a E-M10 IV instead, there's nothing I could do. And that wouldn't tick the rangefinder style box ... So, my search ended with nothing to show. I *could* go for a Sony A6100, but nah ... for all its virtues, it'd feel like a downgrade (I still own the A6000, I know that type of camera).

However, now for the more interesting - if somewhat predicatable - part: Another thing a SiJ does is make you very familiar with your chosen kit - this has been one of the key purposes of the format for a while now, and one many of us have exploited.

The funny thing is: Now that the challenge is drawing to a close, I'm mostly comfortable with the GX9 (again?) - the struggles and all the fighting with what the camera is were definitely worth it. Yes, the niggles remain, but they're just that: niggles.

That said, I'm not sure it'll stay with me long term - but since there's currently nothing to replace it with in a meaningful manner, I'll keep it for the foreseeable future.

The bottom line: We all know, but seldom consider, that comparison is the death of appreciation. If you just use the GX9, it's a very competent, well built camera with a great set of features, period. And, as many of you have pointed out so accurately, of course(!) it can be enjoyed, and also tailored to one's tastes.

Enjoy the camera - I fully agree with what Andrew said in the "GAS" thread: This is the best value in :mu43: right now, at least if you buy new.

M.
If I was a Panasonic shooter I would completely agree. But I'm an Olympus shooter and the Pen F is just.....
 

tonyturley

Legend
Location
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Real Name
Tony
The marginal January weather we typically have has led me to take a few more of what I would call safety shots than I normally would, today being a good example. I am hoping when SiO 21 comes about, the fall foliage and scenery will offer a great deal more options. Our weather here for much of last October was exceptionally nice, although I know I can't count on that again. My chosen gear, the X-T2 + 18mm f2, did force me to be more focused when I chose my compositions. It is a lot easier to find things in the frame that I didn't want with the wider FOV. The 18mm f2 may not be a Sumicron, or even a Fujicron, but it is still a well behaved lens that yields good IQ. SiO 21 is a long way off, but I imagine my gear will be the X-T2 + XF 27 Mk II.
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
Another SiJ completed - and quite happy with my choice and the outcome.

I managed alright most of the time - in spite of the fact that this was a month I'll hopefully be able to forget ...

It may be a bit unusual, but I'm going to tell the last story to hit me because I think it's somewhat off the scale, and at the same time, there's a funny twist to it in the end (i.e. today).

Thursday night, two of my students contacted me. They felt that a third one, a friend of theirs, was losing it, and quickly. He had been depressed and stressed out for months (of which I was aware) - to the point that he actually stated that he no longer wanted to live! As many fifteen year olds do, neither had he told any adults (not his parents, not any of his teachers, not his coach), nor would any of his classmates tell anyone - they tried to comfort him and cheer him up, which quite obviously didn't work. What had finally triggered his friends' change of mind was the fact that he had switched from being down to being all out aggressive, to the point that he mumbled confused death threats to anyone who would catch him in a foul mood, something that happened more and more often; as if this wasn't bad enough already, he had started uttering a few days ago that he wanted to eradicate the whole of humanity. O-kay ... All alarms went off, I contacted my headmaster. We knew we had to act, but we were in the uncomfortable position that we didn't know for sure if the threats were serious or just a way of getting attention - yes, maybe they were a cry for help, even though this may be the worst way of calling out ...

What followed were 42 intense hours - we checked options, set down protocols, secured certain students (by removing them from the school temporarily). Friday at noon we - the headmaster's debuty in charge of his form and I - had our first direct encounter with the student who had caused all this. It was a tense, but surprisingly productive encounter in that he was astonishingly open about the fact that he lost control over his thoughts at times and drifted into an alternate reality where he had decided to fight his personal demons, of which there were quite a few. He couldn't prevent those incidences because he didn't know what triggered them. But, and that was the crucial point, even though he was not able to control those states, he was still aware of them and could describe them in comprehensible terms. Of course, we also grilled him on some very tough issues (like his plans and resources as well as his background - weapons, drugs, the whole checklist), and while he was sometimes very shaken, his answers were coherent and genuine enough. It was only at this point that we were able to pretty much dismiss the idea that he would do something violent to himself or others - he clearly didn't want to, and he clearly stated that his fights only concerned his inner, apocalyptic reality. After another meeting three hours later, we knew enough to feel safe about letting him go - he knew he had his one chance of coming clean with his parents, and if things didn't go exactly as agreed upon, we would take action (we had established the necessary frameworks and procedures before the first meeting).

I spend the rest of the next 24 hours picking up the pieces, calling people, checking on him and the other two students, making sure they had a framework for talking to each other (something the originator felt strongly about), talking to his parents as well as my headmaster and his debuty. By Saturday afternoon, I finally could do a last hand-over to the debuty after talking to the whole family of the student and assessing the situation. We're now pretty sure he's getting all the help and attention he needs. Should his "demons" come back (they seem to be gone), his parents will seek professional help immediately. Actually, this last part is the only one I'm not fully comfortable with - but it's out of my hands, the headmaster and his team will decide if contacting a pychiatrist should be mandated. The way I see it, even if it's more than plausible that the current situation has a lot to do with this (as well as the persona of the student, which I will not go into here), it's not completely implausible that we're dealing with a psychosis of some kind. If it wa me, I'd want him checked.

There you have it. All in a day's work (or three). While I'm quite relieved, all the tension made my body act up overnight - I spent a considerable amount of time in the bathroom. But I'm mostly recovered - and what's more, things seem en route for a possibly long, but reasonably promising process of healing and mending.

So it's fair to say that I'm feeling pretty worn out - but I can also state with certainty that even in the worst moments during the past month, the challenge offered a counterpoint and an escape from a really quite bleak and sometimes even scary world; today more than ever before. We'll see how things develop - but I'm sure this board will always be a place of inspiration and comfort.

EDIT: Completely forgot the twist ... I turned out that, of all places, the big factory I chose as today's target was ... the location of a workplace shooting in 2013. I only remembered when I found the memorial. Of course, I had heard of it at the time. Which only proves the sometimes, the subconscious is a mightily scary thing ...

As Martin has already indicated, the next "Single in" is planned for October. Lots of things can happen until then. I'm certainly hopeful that even if we're not back to normal by then, we should be able to feel a bit more comfortable about the whole situation. I'm looking forward to the next "Single in" - if it turns out anything like this month, it'll be a joy as well as an honour to participate in and organise it!

All the best, your host,
M.
 
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marlof

Trying to focus
Location
The Netherlands
Real Name
Marlof
That's quite someting, Matt. Well done in being there. These times are troublesome, especially for young minds. And thanks for putting in your efforts for SiJ as well. See you in October the latest. Just put the GX9 and 20 in my EDC bag. Quite the space recovered compared to the EM1 mk III and 25 1.2!
 

gryphon1911

Hall of Famer
Location
Central Ohio, USA
Real Name
Andrew
So, I said “scr@w” it and went out today for the final picture.

4-6 inches of wet snow, turning to rain.
Grabbed a mask and my wife and the camera kit and went to the zoo.

Wanted to end it out strong and then start Monday with my personal lo-fi challenge.

Hopefully, I’ll be able to go through the pics I just took and find something worthy of the final day.
 

agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
Another SiJ completed - and quite happy with my choice and the outcome.

I managed alright most of the time - in spite of the fact that this was a month I'll hopefully be able to forget ...

It may be a bit unusual, but I'm going to tell the last story to hit me because I think it's somewhat off the scale, and at the same time, there's a funny twist to it in the end (i.e. today).

Thursday night, two of my students contacted me. They felt that a third one, a friend of theirs, was losing it, and quickly. He had been depressed and stressed out for months (of which I was aware) - to the point that he actually stated that he no longer wanted to live! As many fifteen year olds do, neither had he told any adults (not his parents, not any of his teachers, not his coach), nor would any of his classmates tell anyone - they tried to comfort him and cheer him up, which quite obviously didn't work. What had finally triggered his friends' change of mind was the fact that he had switched from being down to being all out aggressive, to the point that he mumbled confused death threats to anyone who would catch him in a foul mood, something that happened more and more often; as if this wasn't bad enough already, he had started uttering a few days ago that he wanted to eradicate the whole of humanity. O-kay ... All alarms went off, I contacted my headmaster. We knew we had to act, but we were in the uncomfortable position that we didn't know for sure if the threats were serious or just a way of getting attention - yes, maybe they were a cry for help, even though this may be the worst way of calling out ...

What followed were 42 intense hours - we checked options, set down protocols, secured certain students (by removing them from the school temporarily). Friday at noon we - the headmaster's debuty in charge of his form and I - had our first direct encounter with the student who had caused all this. It was a tense, but surprisingly productive encounter in that he was astonishingly open about the fact that he lost control over his thoughts at times and drifted into an alternate reality where he had decided to fight his personal demons, of which there were quite a few. He couldn't prevent those incidences because he didn't know what triggered them. But, and that was the crucial point, even though he was not able to control those states, he was still aware of them and could describe them in comprehensible terms. Of course, we also grilled him on some very tough issues (like his plans and resources as well as his background - weapons, drugs, the whole checklist), and while he was sometimes very shaken, his answers were coherent and genuine enough. It was only at this point that we were able to pretty much dismiss the idea that he would do something violent to himself or others - he clearly didn't want to, and he clearly stated that his fights only concerned his inner, apocalyptic reality. After another meeting three hours later, we knew enough to feel safe about letting him go - he knew he had his one chance of coming clean with his parents, and if things didn't go exactly as agreed upon, we would take action (we had established the necessary frameworks and procedures before the first meeting).

I spend the rest of the next 24 hours picking up the pieces, calling people, checking on him and the other two students, making sure they had a framework for talking to each other (something the originator felt strongly about), talking to his parents as well as my headmaster and his debuty. By Saturday afternoon, I finally could do a last hand-over to the debuty after talking to the whole family of the student and assessing the situation. We're now pretty sure he's getting all the help and attention he needs. Should his "demons" come back (they seem to be gone), his parents will seek professional help immediately. Actually, this last part is the only one I'm not fully comfortable with - but it's out of my hands, the headmaster and his team will decide if contacting a pychiatrist should be mandated. The way I see it, even if it's more than plausible that the current situation has a lot to do with this (as well as the persona of the student, which I will not go into here), it's not completely implausible that we're dealing with a psychosis of some kind. If it wa me, I'd want him checked.

There you have it. All in a day's work (or three). While I'm quite relieved, all the tension made my body act up overnight - I spent a considerable amount of time in the bathroom. But I'm mostly recovered - and what's more, things seem en route for a possibly long, but reasonably promising process of healing and mending.

So it's fair to say that I'm feeling pretty worn out - but I can also state with certainty that even in the worst moments during the past month, the challenge offered a counterpoint and an escape from a really quite bleak and sometimes even scary world; today more than ever before. We'll see how things develop - but I'm sure this board will always be a place of inspiration and comfort.

EDIT: Completely forgot the twist ... I turned out that, of all places, the big factory I chose as today's target was ... the location of a workplace shooting in 2013. I only remembered when I found the memorial. Of course, I had heard of it at the time. Which only proves the sometimes, the subconscious is a mightily scary thing ...

As Martin has already indicated, the next "Single in" is planned for October. Lots of things can happen until then. I'm certainly hopeful that even if we're not back to normal by then, we should be able to feel a bit more comfortable about the whole situation. I'm looking forward to the next "Single in" - if it turns out anything like this month, it'll be a joy as well as an honour to participate in and organise it!

All the best, your host,
M.
Whew, that's a heavy event to add to an already heavy... indeterminate period of time. I'm glad the student has folks who are genuinely interested in meeting him where he's at. Often, at least here in the states, young people are treated as products, both in the education and the treating of any - very real, to them - mental/emotional disturbances which are really part of adolescence for anyone, at various levels of intensity. I know I struggled during some youth outreach roles I've had in the past, at making anything I had to say or do relevant to the younger person's actual experience.

I knew I felt something vaguely ominous about your photo for the day!
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
If I was a Panasonic shooter I would completely agree. But I'm an Olympus shooter and the Pen F is just.....

Ahhhh... my life would be so much easier (perhaps) if I could just be a Panasonic shooter - but my problem (which I've known for some time, but am only know discovering the hidden and disturbing scope thereof) ... is that I seem to like my Pen F just as much as my GX9.

So, actually, if I were just an Olympus and Panasonic shooter, that would simplify things.

But then there are moments when I find myself reaching for my Ricoh GRii .... and all is lost.
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
Another SiJ completed - and quite happy with my choice and the outcome.

I managed alright most of the time - in spite of the fact that this was a month I'll hopefully be able to forget ...

It may be a bit unusual, but I'm going to tell the last story to hit me because I think it's somewhat off the scale, and at the same time, there's a funny twist to it in the end (i.e. today).

Thursday night, two of my students contacted me. They felt that a third one, a friend of theirs, was losing it, and quickly. He had been depressed and stressed out for months (of which I was aware) - to the point that he actually stated that he no longer wanted to live! As many fifteen year olds do, neither had he told any adults (not his parents, not any of his teachers, not his coach), nor would any of his classmates tell anyone - they tried to comfort him and cheer him up, which quite obviously didn't work. What had finally triggered his friends' change of mind was the fact that he had switched from being down to being all out aggressive, to the point that he mumbled confused death threats to anyone who would catch him in a foul mood, something that happened more and more often; as if this wasn't bad enough already, he had started uttering a few days ago that he wanted to eradicate the whole of humanity. O-kay ... All alarms went off, I contacted my headmaster. We knew we had to act, but we were in the uncomfortable position that we didn't know for sure if the threats were serious or just a way of getting attention - yes, maybe they were a cry for help, even though this may be the worst way of calling out ...

What followed were 42 intense hours - we checked options, set down protocols, secured certain students (by removing them from the school temporarily). Friday at noon we - the headmaster's debuty in charge of his form and I - had our first direct encounter with the student who had caused all this. It was a tense, but surprisingly productive encounter in that he was astonishingly open about the fact that he lost control over his thoughts at times and drifted into an alternate reality where he had decided to fight his personal demons, of which there were quite a few. He couldn't prevent those incidences because he didn't know what triggered them. But, and that was the crucial point, even though he was not able to control those states, he was still aware of them and could describe them in comprehensible terms. Of course, we also grilled him on some very tough issues (like his plans and resources as well as his background - weapons, drugs, the whole checklist), and while he was sometimes very shaken, his answers were coherent and genuine enough. It was only at this point that we were able to pretty much dismiss the idea that he would do something violent to himself or others - he clearly didn't want to, and he clearly stated that his fights only concerned his inner, apocalyptic reality. After another meeting three hours later, we knew enough to feel safe about letting him go - he knew he had his one chance of coming clean with his parents, and if things didn't go exactly as agreed upon, we would take action (we had established the necessary frameworks and procedures before the first meeting).

I spend the rest of the next 24 hours picking up the pieces, calling people, checking on him and the other two students, making sure they had a framework for talking to each other (something the originator felt strongly about), talking to his parents as well as my headmaster and his debuty. By Saturday afternoon, I finally could do a last hand-over to the debuty after talking to the whole family of the student and assessing the situation. We're now pretty sure he's getting all the help and attention he needs. Should his "demons" come back (they seem to be gone), his parents will seek professional help immediately. Actually, this last part is the only one I'm not fully comfortable with - but it's out of my hands, the headmaster and his team will decide if contacting a pychiatrist should be mandated. The way I see it, even if it's more than plausible that the current situation has a lot to do with this (as well as the persona of the student, which I will not go into here), it's not completely implausible that we're dealing with a psychosis of some kind. If it wa me, I'd want him checked.

There you have it. All in a day's work (or three). While I'm quite relieved, all the tension made my body act up overnight - I spent a considerable amount of time in the bathroom. But I'm mostly recovered - and what's more, things seem en route for a possibly long, but reasonably promising process of healing and mending.

So it's fair to say that I'm feeling pretty worn out - but I can also state with certainty that even in the worst moments during the past month, the challenge offered a counterpoint and an escape from a really quite bleak and sometimes even scary world; today more than ever before. We'll see how things develop - but I'm sure this board will always be a place of inspiration and comfort.

EDIT: Completely forgot the twist ... I turned out that, of all places, the big factory I chose as today's target was ... the location of a workplace shooting in 2013. I only remembered when I found the memorial. Of course, I had heard of it at the time. Which only proves the sometimes, the subconscious is a mightily scary thing ...

As Martin has already indicated, the next "Single in" is planned for October. Lots of things can happen until then. I'm certainly hopeful that even if we're not back to normal by then, we should be able to feel a bit more comfortable about the whole situation. I'm looking forward to the next "Single in" - if it turns out anything like this month, it'll be a joy as well as an honour to participate in and organise it!

All the best, your host,
M.

Thank you for telling the details of this story Matt. As well as for mentioning the historic details of the place where you were photographing. It's a relief that the student in question has made it through the process - and also that you, your colleagues, and the other students, have also come through relatively unscathed. I say 'relatively' because going through intense life situations and human dramas tends to affect most of us in ways which we may not always be immediately aware of. Hopefully the kid's parents will find a way to get him some form of therapy that will in some way be effective for him, and maybe for them, too. But, dude - it's really good to hear that you made it through what sounds like a seriously effing insane time - without losing most of your marbles. And at the same time... producing some truly killer (pardon the unintentional pun) images and photographs.

It calls to mind an old quote attributed to Henri Cartier-Bresson, something to the effect that we don't (merely) make photographs with cameras and lenses ... but, rather, with our eyes, our minds, and our hearts.

Thanks again for organizing all this - being the 'host' - and for the outrageously cool and eclectic selection of websites and videos which you referenced, in your opening posts, on a daily basis.... they've been sooooo damn cool.
 
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agentlossing

All-Pro
Location
S. Oregon Coast (the Northernmost-Cal of them All)
Real Name
Andrew Lossing
I find challenges like this have to happen at the right time for me to stick with them. Sometimes it's the need to explore a bit of kit that makes it work, and I was able to do that with the Pentax KP. I'm pretty happy with the JPEG "recipe" that I found on the Pentax forum. The KP has a rather unique ability to color tint JPEGs in a subtle way that offers some effects beyond just the tint. Cyan makes colors feel much more rich, somehow, while a little less saturated. In addition, the shadows have just a little color shift which feels a bit like color film, somewhat Fuji-esque. Magenta brings out detail in the lower midtones, good for subsequent conversion to B&W if you are okay doing that with a JPEG.

It has taken a little... discipline to get used to carrying and shooting a DSLR, but there are some good points about having a sturdy body - and one that knows how to hang from a strap, unlike very lightweight mirrorless bodies that tend to flop around - with weather resistance, a bright viewfinder (that's neutral to wearing sunglasses, unlike EVFs) and very reliable metering. I got over my initial concern with metering by realizing that the KP has possibly the closest I've found to a true "0" level. Very little under or over needed via the EV comp dial. Plus, of course, noise is nearly nonexistent. While there was initial resistance to the idea of a pre-processor which applies NR to the RAW file, I find the results surprisingly good.

I have been missing my GR, though, by necessity of carrying the KP around every day. Must get back to shooting 28mm.
 

rayvonn

Hall of Famer
So what have we learned as a result of the challenge?

For me, it merely confirmed what we already know, in that:
  • Most, but not all of the time, one can still get ok images out of a not so good lens.
  • However this means spending a lot of time in PP.
  • We (alright, I) don't want to spend a lot of time in PP.
  • Using better lenses results in images being ready with little to no need for PP which are ready in a tenth of the time.
  • A lens rendering an image how you want as opposed to having to spend time in PP making the image looking how you want (with that often not being possible) makes a hell of a difference.
  • For these reasons, spending more on better gear is generally warranted.
  • Going through the month long process to confirm all this was intereting and worthwhile.
 

rayvonn

Hall of Famer
I find challenges like this have to happen at the right time for me to stick with them. Sometimes it's the need to explore a bit of kit that makes it work, and I was able to do that with the Pentax KP. I'm pretty happy with the JPEG "recipe" that I found on the Pentax forum. The KP has a rather unique ability to color tint JPEGs in a subtle way that offers some effects beyond just the tint. Cyan makes colors feel much more rich, somehow, while a little less saturated. In addition, the shadows have just a little color shift which feels a bit like color film, somewhat Fuji-esque. Magenta brings out detail in the lower midtones, good for subsequent conversion to B&W if you are okay doing that with a JPEG.

It has taken a little... discipline to get used to carrying and shooting a DSLR, but there are some good points about having a sturdy body - and one that knows how to hang from a strap, unlike very lightweight mirrorless bodies that tend to flop around - with weather resistance, a bright viewfinder (that's neutral to wearing sunglasses, unlike EVFs) and very reliable metering. I got over my initial concern with metering by realizing that the KP has possibly the closest I've found to a true "0" level. Very little under or over needed via the EV comp dial. Plus, of course, noise is nearly nonexistent. While there was initial resistance to the idea of a pre-processor which applies NR to the RAW file, I find the results surprisingly good.

I have been missing my GR, though, by necessity of carrying the KP around every day. Must get back to shooting 28mm.
It was interesting in that, for me, looking at your KP images, they were identical to the GRIII renderings.
 
Location
Boston Burbs
Real Name
David
The marginal January weather we typically have has led me to take a few more of what I would call safety shots than I normally would, today being a good example. I am hoping when SiO 21 comes about, the fall foliage and scenery will offer a great deal more options. Our weather here for much of last October was exceptionally nice, although I know I can't count on that again. My chosen gear, the X-T2 + 18mm f2, did force me to be more focused when I chose my compositions. It is a lot easier to find things in the frame that I didn't want with the wider FOV. The 18mm f2 may not be a Sumicron, or even a Fujicron, but it is still a well behaved lens that yields good IQ. SiO 21 is a long way off, but I imagine my gear will be the X-T2 + XF 27 Mk II.
The 18mm and 27mm were my favorites on the X-E3.
Ahhhh... my life would be so much easier (perhaps) if I could just be a Panasonic shooter - but my problem (which I've known for some time, but am only know discovering the hidden and disturbing scope thereof) ... is that I seem to like my Pen F just as much as my GX9.

So, actually, if I were just an Olympus and Panasonic shooter, that would simplify things.

But then there are moments when I find myself reaching for my Ricoh GRii .... and all is lost.
It was hard, but I did go down to just one system last year. If JIP were to release a Pen F.2 with phase AF and sealed I might consider going down to just one (probably not :shakehead:).

I do miss the X70, I considered buying it back when it showed up in the FS area a few months ago. But while X70 is a lot lighter and wonderfully simple, the Pen F fills the role.
 

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