Single In Single in July (SiJy) 2020 - day 25

MoonMind

Hall of Famer
Dec 29, 2013
Switzerland
Matt
Start Date
Jul 25, 2020
End Date
Jul 25, 2020
This was worth an "uhm ... " when I frist heard it, but in a way, it's pretty insightful ...


We swallow our pride over piles of problems
We whine and complain but we don't try to solve them
We're reaching for answers but nobody's got them

Get out of my way because I'm 25
And I still act like I'm 10 goddamn years old
I'm 25
And I still act like I'm 10 goddamn years old
If you really want to listen to the song, there's a player on the lyrics' site. Be warned, though: If you're a ska or punk fan, you have *nothing* to worry ...

M.
 

tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Tony
Invasive species from Asia have long been a threat to the flora of North America (and Europe, for that matter). Chestnut blight, Kudzu, Knotweed, Stiltgrass, many varieties of Honeysuckle, Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, the list is seemingly endless. American Elms, Ulmus americana, once lined the streets of American cities, towering over cityscapes and residential neighborhoods alike – until the Elm Bark Beetle began to spread across North America. Believed to have been introduced in a shipment of lumber arriving in New York City in the 1920s, the fungus spread by the beetles decimated the American Elm population. The number of large, mature specimens is a shadow of what once was, and American Elm is now often seen as smaller understory trees like this one, growing on the margins of forests and competing with other trees for sunlight and nutrients.

Day 25.JPG
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NoSeconds

All-Pro
Jan 1, 2017
Troy
Today was a busy day, we finished organising the furniture for the new house, picked up the last of the white goods and I even managed to drop a heavy timber day bed on myself (slipped as I was walking it up the ramp into the trailer)... completely forgot to get the camera out until just now, approx 4 beers into a mixed six pack of excellent pedigree...

Three of which appear in the days photo, the most interesting was “Panther Cream” an exceptional whiskey barrel aged imperial stout that goes close to rivalling Colonial’s “Inquest” with a 10.2% abv and rich dark chocolate overtones mingled with subtle whiskey aromas...


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theoldsmithy

Hall of Famer
Jan 7, 2013
Cheshire, England
Martin Connolly
Today was a busy day, we finished organising the furniture for the new house, picked up the last of the white goods and I even managed to drop a heavy timber day bed on myself (slipped as I was walking it up the ramp into the trailer)... completely forgot to get the camera out until just now, approx 4 beers into a mixed six pack of excellent pedigree...

Three of which appear in the days photo, the most interesting was “Panther Cream” an exceptional whiskey barrel aged imperial stout that goes close to rivalling Colonial’s “Inquest” with a 10.2% abv and rich dark chocolate overtones mingled with subtle whiskey aromas...


View attachment 229688
I must say you have an impressive range of beers available in Oz. The impression you get of Australian beer in the UK is that it’s just fizzy bland stuff (Fosters and XXXX). We never see varieties like you’re showing here, which is a great shame as I’m sure there’d be a ready market for them.
 
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theoldsmithy

Hall of Famer
Jan 7, 2013
Cheshire, England
Martin Connolly
Invasive species from Asia have long been a threat to the flora of North America (and Europe, for that matter). Chestnut blight, Kudzu, Knotweed, Stiltgrass, many varieties of Honeysuckle, Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, the list is seemingly endless. American Elms, Ulmus americana, once lined the streets of American cities, towering over cityscapes and residential neighborhoods alike – until the Elm Bark Beetle began to spread across North America. Believed to have been introduced in a shipment of lumber arriving in New York City in the 1920s, the fungus spread by the beetles decimated the American Elm population. The number of large, mature specimens is a shadow of what once was, and American Elm is now often seen as smaller understory trees like this one, growing on the margins of forests and competing with other trees for sunlight and nutrients.

View attachment 229687
That sounds like what we refer to as Dutch Elm Disease, which may be a slur on our near neighbours. But elms have been virtually wiped out in Britain. Now we’re all worried about ash dieback disease and oak processionary moths. If those two species were hard hit the countryside would be a very sad place.
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Jul 13, 2011
Lexington, VA
Steve
E-PM1 at the plate. Of course, it's weekend and hot, so here's a picture of my mantle. Those are my paternal grandparents. I wasn't happy with the sharpness of the image, then I thought to take a look at the sharpness of that old photo.:doh: Another lesson in the difference between a technically correct image and a treasured image.
mantle.jpg
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tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Tony
That sounds like what we refer to as Dutch Elm Disease, which may be a slur on our near neighbours. But elms have been virtually wiped out in Britain. Now we’re all worried about ash dieback disease and oak processionary moths. If those two species were hard hit the countryside would be a very sad place.
It is the same thing. I've read it got the "Dutch" part of the name because the fungus was isolated and identified by Dutch scientists. We are already hit hard by the Emerald Ash Borer, and Oak blight is a real concern.
 

donlaw

Hall of Famer
Sep 14, 2012
Texas
Don
First time I dropped by the office since February. No one there.
It is suppose to open Aug 17th, but the way things are going that may see further delay. View to the west with tropical cloud waves flowing in off hurricane Hanna.
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MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Aug 27, 2013
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Miguel Tejada-Flores
My granddaughter Opal, 6 years old but soon to be 7, started learning to play the fiddle a little after she turned 6 and now is in the process of turning into a seriously good musician. But not merely is she a young musician with 'chops' - even better, she loves playing. She has a great teacher, and her father - my son Rafe - is a rather fine musician and multi-instrumentalist himself. All of which means that when I accompanied them on a multiple-day camping trip in a remote and beautiful area of eastern Oregon - Hart mountain - everyone brought instruments.

Here, Opal and Rafe decided to play a song with a strange and beautiful background - looking down from the mountain on the continually changing lakes which have been forming and reforming at the base of the mountain for millenia.

X30_July25_Opal&Rafe_playing_music.jpg
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I feel lucky to be able to hang with great musicians; being related to them is the icing on the cake.
 

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