Documentary Small-town Vibes

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The other thing I always see, both in the small Oregon town where I live, and in other small towns which I visit or pass through, is... or, rather, are... lawn decorations.

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Here in Oregon, in the Pacific Northwest, we get a lot of rain and the occasional snowstorm... but the very notion of a flamingo is both exotic, fanciful, and otherworldly.
 
And always the ubiquitous empty lots... with, as Andrew noted, one or two cars that don't look like they could possibly still be on the road...but somehow still are. Except, in this case, I'm pretty sure this old rusted GMC pickup has 'given up the ghost', as the old saying goes.

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And always the ubiquitous empty lots... with, as Andrew noted, one or two cars that don't look like they could possibly still be on the road...but somehow still are. Except, in this case, I'm pretty sure this old rusted GMC pickup has 'given up the ghost', as the old saying goes.

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You know, I absolutely thought that "give up the ghost" was one heck of a Germanism until I found the expression on this forum several times; now I wonder if it's a Anglicism ...

Impressive (telling) shot, impressive car.

M.
 
You know, I absolutely thought that "give up the ghost" was one heck of a Germanism until I found the expression on this forum several times; now I wonder if it's a Anglicism ...

Impressive (telling) shot, impressive car.

M.
A quick web search confirmed my suspicions: it's a Bible reference; some translations of the Bible, especially King James, refer to Jesus on the cross "giving up the ghost." Ghost = spirit or breath, all considered similar concepts in Greek as in Hebrew. The Greek phrase is something akin to "breathing one's last" or breathing out, the life essence of a person, not to breathe it in again.

When different language speaking western cultures have phrases in common there's a very good chance they originated in the holy writ.
 
A quick web search confirmed my suspicions: it's a Bible reference; some translations of the Bible, especially King James, refer to Jesus on the cross "giving up the ghost." Ghost = spirit or breath, all considered similar concepts in Greek as in Hebrew. The Greek phrase is something akin to "breathing one's last" or breathing out, the life essence of a person, not to breathe it in again.

When different language speaking western cultures have phrases in common there's a very good chance they originated in the holy writ.
Or earlier. The Indo-Germanic languages all go back to Sanskrit and ancient Egyptian, if not beyond.

Some games played by English school children were not documented until very recently, but date back to Roman times. Passed down from generation to generation of primary school pupils orally and by usage.

Fascinating stuff.
 
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