The Amazing Emporium of Wondrous Tunes (aka: What are you listening to?)

ReD

Hall of Famer
Mar 27, 2013
123
A friend of my wife's we hung out with in 1972, he was black (African-American), and he objected to the line "and the colored girls go ...." -- the song was very important then for many reasons - Lou Reed's Transformer and David Bowie's Ziggy Stardust kicked off Glamrock in a huge way in the U.S., providing some relief from the excesses of the late 1960's. Walk On The Wild Side ran into censor problems for "...but she never lost her head, even when she was giving....", but us kids knew in an instant, and lack of Internet was no deterrent.

But move forward a few years to Money For Nothing, and we still have these censor issues - for example in the mid-1980s MTV played the video uncensored, radio stations spun it as well, but forward into the 2000's it's no longer acceptable in general society for the gay slurs.

Race, gender, and age sensitivities were all the rage in 1972, and one of my wife's friends used to intone so seriously back then "We're not girls, we're women" -- but fast-forward to the 90's and 2000's and here in the U.S. they're now called "guys". -Unintended consequences.

Yeah Shakespeare wouldn't stand a chance nowadays
 

Petach

Hall of Famer
Oct 22, 2011
123
UK, Essex
Peter Tachauer
I saw an article on the BBC this morning about a guitar and a Sax for one handed players, which allows the musician to play as though they had had both hands.

I searched Youtube to find it, without success; but I found this guy playing one handed on an ordinary guitar.....and he aint half bad.

Hendrix? Eat your heart out.

 
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dalethorn

Guest
My most fave track EVER!
I missed this the first time around, but "fave track ever" being such a strong recommendation, I finally had a listen and grabbed it on iTunes. I don't remember if I heard this way back when, but my favorite genre of pop music features bands like Flock of Seagulls, INXS, A-Ha, Culture Club, ... many others. The early days of MTV when they were all about videos like this was a window onto paradise. Then, like so many things, the dream ended.
 
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dalethorn

Guest
some of our British members are old enough to know this one.....but are they cool enough to have it in their collection? I have a nice camera I'll trade for a minty original of the LP that this came from.
I used to look like that. Flowered shirt with white cuffs and collar, psychedelic tie, bell-bottoms, and suede boots with 3-inch heels, cleats, and chrome toes.
 
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dalethorn

Guest
A picture??? :p
Unfortunately I don't have any full-length photos from that time, and in fact I didn't own a camera then. The first photo circa 1966 shows the white collar and jacket over the shirt. The second photo (ca. 1968?) has something colorful under the jacket, and the third photo is my civilian attire in February 1970, post-military, just prior to the days hanging out at Kent State. In 1966 in Akron Ohio we were pre-hippie - long hair could get you assaulted then. Heading off to military service in late '66 I mostly lost touch with that crowd. Afterward in late 1969, it was a very different world, with a well-developed psychedelic drug culture. I have held in my hands a full-size cake-tin container full of LSD tablets. The narcs were very busy then, as some 'dealers' were selling those drugs to underage kids. We were tripping and playing Pink Floyd's Ummagumma, the Beatles' Abbey Road, the Stones' Let It Bleed and Live'R Than You'll Ever Be, Spooky II by Spooky Tooth, Crazy World of Arthur Brown, etc. etc. Some of the guys in our head-shop got into meth in those days, so I headed off to a commune while the junkies took over the shop. The things that I experienced there between Nov. 1969 and May 1970 would fill a book. A large book.





 

bartjeej

Hall of Famer
Nov 12, 2010
124
bart
Good Whoa indeed!

I'm going to a Parliament Funkadelic concert tonight!

Actually my favourite song of theirs is this one... funky as anything, but with some more thoughtful lyrics
 
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bartjeej

Hall of Famer
Nov 12, 2010
124
bart
Man, I have to say they are one bunch of talented and fun musicians. George Clinton is getting old, and really needed to sit down a couple of times, but he was always more of a conductor of all the madness going on around him, than a musician anyway. And after lighting up a couple of joints, he was jumping up and down the stage as if he was 35 instead of 75 :hmmm: too bad that the sound at the venue was awful. Still, it was a proper party.

As for Make America Funky Again... this was in Holland, but America will always remain One Nation Under a Groove:dance3:
 
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dalethorn

Guest
Man, I have to say they are one bunch of talented and fun musicians. George Clinton is getting old, and really needed to sit down a couple of times, but he was always more of a conductor of all the madness going on around him, than a musician anyway. And after lighting up a couple of joints, he was jumping up and down the stage as if he was 35 instead of 75 :hmmm: too bad that the sound at the venue was awful. Still, it was a proper party.

As for Make America Funky Again... this was in Holland, but America will always remain One Nation Under a Groove:dance3:
Maggot Brain is where I got introduced to Funkadelic. Now if you listen through it sometime, then compare Buckethead's renditions of Soothsayer. Amazing!
 

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