Fuji The itch for Fujifilm, to switch or not.

L0n3Gr3yW0lf

Veteran
Location
Somerset, UK
Name
Ovi
Hello. Like others, I have been feeling an intense ¹itch of curiosity to try Fujifilm. After my recent thinking about shooting JPEG instead of RAW, trying to find a way to ease the pain of editing 42 MP on my Intel 9th Gen laptop, I have been thinking of the "fame" of Fujifilm cameras.

Now there are 2 main reasons why I am making this post. One is the "fun" side of the photographic process, I love dials and I love aperture rings, I love the ergonomics I had on Olympus OM-Ds cameras and even Panasonic G cameras. With Sony I am finding it very Spartan, very boring and I think it has affected my enjoyment of going out and making pictures. I love the results I get from my Sony a7R II but I have been looking less and less forward to engage with the camera.
The 2nd reason is Argos (UK major store) has in stock the Fujifilm X-S10 (with and without the 15-45mm f 3.5-5.6 OIS lens) for 950 and 999 £. The store has a 30 days return policy if you don't want to keep the item (you don't have to give a reason for why) and I have a store card with Argos where I can pay 12 months later with no interest. So I can test drive the camera at no cost outside of home delivery.

I am unsure of the Fujifilm X-S10 because it lacks the dials and knobs of the X-T series and the buffer is shallower then Kardashian BUT I love the grip (the X-T cameras are quite terrifying to use with the Fujifilm XF 100-400mm f 4.5-5.6 or even the Tamron 150-500mm f 5-6.7).
Now that Sigma offers their wonderful trio of f 1.4s I can get similar (not identical) DoF control at an affordable price as j currently have AND Tamron has the best combo with their 17-70mm f 2.8 and 150-500mm f 5-6.7 at 2.2K £ brand new (only unfortunately).
PS. Almost forgot to add, my main worry with Fujifilm is not the image quality but the autofocus. X-S10 lacks all the subject detection of the X-T4 and newer and its performance does not seem to be very reliable. My alternative (course of action) was getting the Sony a7 IV next year and the AF with that camera seems to be world's apart to what Fujifilm offers right now.


MPB is offering me about 2.1K £ for my entire Sony system (I know it's piss pour value from what I paid but it's better then complete loss) if I do want to go down the Fujifilm road with X-S10 to "recover" my lens selection.
To try or not to try.
 

Piano

Top Veteran
Name
Nigel
Take a look at Fuji Shop - they sell refurbished gear at a fraction of the new cost. Their goods have, in my experience of having bought from them for a long time, always been spot on quality and hardly distinguishable from new. You won’t regret buying Fuji, wherever you purchase from. MPB are also great as are Wex & Cambrian.
 

Herbert Hound

Veteran
Location
The Welsh Borders
Name
Colin
I've just got an X-T30 plus 18-55mm lens.... it arrived two days ago. The difference in control layout is still a bit confusing compared to my Olympus stuff... but the difference in the RAW file colours is astonishing. I always struggled with the greens with Olympus files, to the extent of having numerous different presets to try and tame them, and would spend a lot of time processing them. The Fujifilm RAF files are basically sorted with the "Auto" button in Lightroom.... any further tweaking is purely down to preference rather than necessity.

I've just started playing with the film simulations... they're a lot of fun. I know it's still the honeymoon period... but I'm really glad I tried Fuji and I'm almost certainly going to sell off (or trade) most of my Olympus gear.
 

TNcasual

Veteran
Location
Tennessee
I've just got an X-T30 plus 18-55mm lens.... it arrived two days ago. The difference in control layout is still a bit confusing compared to my Olympus stuff... but the difference in the RAW file colours is astonishing. I always struggled with the greens with Olympus files, to the extent of having numerous different presets to try and tame them, and would spend a lot of time processing them. The Fujifilm RAF files are basically sorted with the "Auto" button in Lightroom.... any further tweaking is purely down to preference rather than necessity.

I've just started playing with the film simulations... they're a lot of fun. I know it's still the honeymoon period... but I'm really glad I tried Fuji and I'm almost certainly going to sell off (or trade) most of my Olympus gear.
I had an X-E2 for a few weeks several years ago. Part of the reason I tried it out is that I wanted to try jpeg shooting with the built in film simulations. I found I like a couple of them, but they needed a slight tweak here and there. But the camera wouldn't allow you to save they changes. So each time I switched modes, I had to rea-adjust the changes. Is this still the case with Fuji? Or can you save a modified film simulation?
 

L0n3Gr3yW0lf

Veteran
Location
Somerset, UK
Name
Ovi
I had an X-E2 for a few weeks several years ago. Part of the reason I tried it out is that I wanted to try jpeg shooting with the built in film simulations. I found I like a couple of them, but they needed a slight tweak here and there. But the camera wouldn't allow you to save they changes. So each time I switched modes, I had to rea-adjust the changes. Is this still the case with Fuji? Or can you save a modified film simulation?
I do believe you can make your own profiles that are saved. Apparently there's a whole community that do Film Recipes where they try to emulate different types of film stock and they give the people the modification to implement them yourself in the camera. I don't know which models support that though (possibly the 24 MP Xtrans cameras or the 26 MP ones).
 
Location
Oregon Coast
Name
Andrew
Unfortunately, for me, the lack of IBIS rules out most Fuji bodies for me: if I'm going to spend medium-to-large money on a digital camera system, it just needs to have IBIS. I like low light, and I don't care a whole lot for tripods (though, totally beside the point, I have a very light/small Smallrig carbon fiber model on its way to me right now, we will see how I get on with that). Not that the XS-10 with IBIS isn't a good camera, it certainly is. But it's cameras like the X100V and XT-30, as well as the X-Pro 3, that appeal to me.
 

L0n3Gr3yW0lf

Veteran
Location
Somerset, UK
Name
Ovi
Unfortunately, for me, the lack of IBIS rules out most Fuji bodies for me: if I'm going to spend medium-to-large money on a digital camera system, it just needs to have IBIS. I like low light, and I don't care a whole lot for tripods (though, totally beside the point, I have a very light/small Smallrig carbon fiber model on its way to me right now, we will see how I get on with that). Not that the XS-10 with IBIS isn't a good camera, it certainly is. But it's cameras like the X100V and XT-30, as well as the X-Pro 3, that appeal to me.
I would like an X-Pro or X-E with IBIS and stick a couple of primes and go out shooting street photography. Or have some fun indoors for candid shots. Fujifilm XF 16mm 1.4 and 23mm f 1.4 look like a lot of fun for doing that (if only 18mm f 1.4 was a bit smaller).
I think Fujifilm will eventually transition to including IBIS on all of their cameras. It doesn't make sense not to anymore .
 
Location
Cambridgeshire, UK.
Name
Charles
Ovi, after over 50 years using cameras, too numerous to mention, I discovered Fujifilm with the X100T. A wonderful camera, but not right for me. Since then, an X-T1, X-H1, another X-T1, and now an X-T3. All superb cameras, and I had few issues with auto focus. X-T3 will probably suit you best, I think. For a (probably) better price for your gear, contact Park Cameras. If you are thinking about buying new, see the prices at e-infin.com. I have bought several items from them, it is no different from what you would buy from Wex etc. I have found MPB and Park Cameras to be first class for used kit.
Hope this helps!
 

L0n3Gr3yW0lf

Veteran
Location
Somerset, UK
Name
Ovi
Ovi, after over 50 years using cameras, too numerous to mention, I discovered Fujifilm with the X100T. A wonderful camera, but not right for me. Since then, an X-T1, X-H1, another X-T1, and now an X-T3. All superb cameras, and I had few issues with auto focus. X-T3 will probably suit you best, I think. For a (probably) better price for your gear, contact Park Cameras. If you are thinking about buying new, see the prices at e-infin.com. I have bought several items from them, it is no different from what you would buy from Wex etc. I have found MPB and Park Cameras to be first class for used kit.
Hope this helps!
I have been using MPB almost exclusively for a few years now. They are just amazing for both selling and buying (they will even bump the price up if the conditions of your gear is better then you stated when they check it, it happens to me a couple of times).
I would prefer to buy used (minimum is good condition and if the price is not to much, like new). The only thing I bought new in the last 3 years was my Olympus gear (which is now sold for quite a while) and my Tamron 28-75mm f 2.8 G2 because it was to new to find used.

I have been thinking about X-T3 as the best bang for the buck but I am worried about the grip side and shape for hand holding telephoto lenses for wildlife.
 

Herbert Hound

Veteran
Location
The Welsh Borders
Name
Colin
I do believe you can make your own profiles that are saved. Apparently there's a whole community that do Film Recipes where they try to emulate different types of film stock and they give the people the modification to implement them yourself in the camera. I don't know which models support that though (possibly the 24 MP Xtrans cameras or the 26 MP ones).
There are 7 "slots" to save custom recipes in. Ritchie Roesch at fujixweekly.com has recipes for all the different X-Trans sensors.
 

L0n3Gr3yW0lf

Veteran
Location
Somerset, UK
Name
Ovi
That's it exactly. There's no reason not to offer it when everyone else does, and the technology is so mature.
I think the issue before was technical and engineering level of implementing it in smaller and/or thinner bodies. Fujifilm bragged about how much more improvement they made to the X-T4 to make it fit in a slimmer body (going from coils to magnets) and then again with X-S10 to implement it in a smaller and thinner body. I think they are catchin up to Olympus, Panasonic and Sony in shrinking the IBIS and lower the cost to be applied to all their cameras.
 

L0n3Gr3yW0lf

Veteran
Location
Somerset, UK
Name
Ovi
What I would like to add is that there are features on Fujifilm that I am excited to get (or re-get as an ex Olympus and Panasonic user) that (at least my current) Sony camera does not have:
*Black-out free burst & 20 FPS
*Pre-Shot
*Focus Bracketing
*Fully capable Electronic Shutter
*Vertical screen tilt capability
*More dependable weather sealing (well for the X-T and X-H cameras)
*No camera/feature lockup while writing to the card
 

bartjeej

Hall of Famer
I'm brand agnostic in theory but the only cameras I'vespent money on over the past 8 years have been Fujis, so I could be considered a Fuji fan. I'm also an enthusiastic follower of the development of weather sealing on cameras.

Fuji, much as I love it, is the company whose weather sealing I rate lowest apart from the  older Sony's, and some consumer Canon bodies. I'm confident that recent Sony a7 series bodies, almost all Nikon Z, all weathersealed Panasonic, higher end Canon bodies, pretty much all Pentax bodies, and of course Olympus (and Leica), have better weather sealing than all Fuji bodies up to and including the X-T4 / X-Pro3 / GFX models. I don't know if things have improved for the X-H2(s) and X-T5.

I know there's plenty of anecdotal evidence of Fuji bodies surviving rainstorms, but so there is for even unsealed cameras. My OG X100 has spent two months in and around the Sahara and some weeks in the jungle with noting but a UV filter over the lens and some electro tape over some ports. But when looking at reports of cameras failing due to rain or splashes, and teardowns showing insufficient sealing, Fuji simply pops up more often than other brands.

So yeah, compared to the first 3 generations of Sony a7 bodies, a Fuji X-T or X-H might be better sealed, but if weather sealing is critical to you, IMO Fuji is unfortunately towards the bottom of the weather sealed class. Doesn't mean they're about to fall apart at the first sign of rain (far from it), but for the very toughest conditions, there're now loads of tougher cameras out there.
 

Aaron English

Regular
Location
Idaho
Get a used XT-3 and a used lens or two and check it out to see if you like it. That is what I did and I love my XT-3 and have taken it into some very abusive environments with no problem. Image quality and mailability in post is superior to m4/3 in my experience. I shoot both m4/3 and Fujifilm. Love them both for different reasons. High ISO on Fuji is a dream, IBIS on Olympus is a dream as well as the computational features that allow you to easily get images that with other systems would require detailed planning and a lot of filters and post production.
 
About 8 months ago I purchased an X-T4. I love the retro dials etc but will admit now that I have tried it the traditional PASM controlled camera is far better if you are interested in wildlife as it is quicker to use.

A lot of their lenses are soft on the edges compared to Mu-43 lenses and the stabilization is no where near as good as Olympus. So 6 / 7 stops on a Fuji is no where near the same as on a Olympus.

They also dont really have a super zoom for travel. their 18-135 is like the Oly 12-200, way too soft for me.
The Tamron 18-300 is sharp enough and has fantastic range but lousy stabilisation. Good to steady the view but not to lower stutter speeds.

I think people who think Fuji stalilization is good have not tried the Oly EM1 series with the 12-100 that really is good. [That last statement may come back to bite me :doh:]

If you want to try macro their 80mm is far too heave but the new 30mm may be OK not sure.

They are X-T series are a nice fun cameras to have and they are fine for landscape, street etc but for wildlife I would get a XH line body.

They are a fun camera, but I wont be selling my Oly gear any time soon.
 

Darmok N Jalad

There are FOUR LIGHTS!
Location
Tanagra
Unfortunately, for me, the lack of IBIS rules out most Fuji bodies for me: if I'm going to spend medium-to-large money on a digital camera system, it just needs to have IBIS. I like low light, and I don't care a whole lot for tripods (though, totally beside the point, I have a very light/small Smallrig carbon fiber model on its way to me right now, we will see how I get on with that). Not that the XS-10 with IBIS isn't a good camera, it certainly is. But it's cameras like the X100V and XT-30, as well as the X-Pro 3, that appeal to me.
For what it’s worth, I didn’t find I missed IBIS all that much when I had the X-T3. I was able to handhold sharp shots a 1/15s at the UWA end, and the tele lenses have enough OIS to account for decent stability at the long end. For non-stabilized lenses, like primes, you can fall back on the high ISO performance of the sensor. 6400-12800 was not really a problem, IMO.

Also, I agree with the above, the final shots are really quite workable. Feels like you can really pull a lot out of the shadows when needed.
 

Iron

All-Pro
Location
New Zealand
Name
Tímo
To try or not to try.
...To try... or else you won't be able to sleep?
I'm brand agnostic in theory but the only cameras I'vespent money on over the past 8 years have been Fujis, so I could be considered a Fuji fan. I'm also an enthusiastic follower of the development of weather sealing on cameras.
I am also brand agnostic and since we now have plenty choose from, we are in search of that one camera that we are going to enjoy working with perpetually.

I am a fan of weather-sealing on anything. Cameras, outdoor equipment, sensors, etc. My work in my previous life involved working all seasons and in rough terrain so IP44 was just the bare minimum. I even worked with equipment rated at IP79K!
So yeah, compared to the first 3 generations of Sony a7 bodies, a Fuji X-T or X-H might be better sealed, but if weather sealing is critical to you, IMO Fuji is unfortunately towards the bottom of the weather sealed class. Doesn't mean they're about to fall apart at the first sign of rain (far from it), but for the very toughest conditions, there're now loads of tougher cameras out there.
Weather-sealing is a tricky topic because even when a manufacturer rates their cameras IP55 or IP65, oftentimes they don't publish them because of liability. High-end Canon and Nikon DSLRs are easily IP44 but they don't claim it due to liability. Weather-sealing is only as good as the weakest point and, oftentimes, the weakest point is exposed by the user. You took very good care of your X100 in the Sahara with carbonate dust, while many others bring their IP44 cameras there and most probably failing to close one flap completely and get the dust to flood the whole body/lens.

Good practice is still best when dealing with weather sealing with any equipment. Many technicians observe corrosion inside weather-sealed bodies, even with pro gear. Users just don't let the system breathe. Many would shoot in a thunderstorm/torrential rain using a weather-sealed kit, dry the outside, keep the lens attached until the next season, only to discover the the main board or some other component has already failed due to corrosion/water ingress.

I think weather-sealing is completely misunderstood. IP44, which is the bare minimum for my ex-work, simply means that Ingress Protection (IP) is assured for solid objects (4) above 1mm and "water" splash at any angle (4) and to get that limit, water ingress, even by a small margin is allowed. A good example is the older MFT Olympus cameras where their testing involves water jets at all angles but the pressure coming from the jets is undisclosed. They are marketed as weather-sealed but only rated them IPX4, which is of course, very conservative. X means they didn't rate them for solid objects, but it doesn't mean they aren't tested. The latest O-M5 is rated at IP53 so, they accept liability up to ingress protection by (5) dust that could interfere with normal operation but not fully dust-sealed and (3), lower than the E-M5 III, which is just water protection from any angle at 60 degrees.
A lot of their lenses are soft on the edges compared to Mu-43 lenses
I did a crash course in optical engineering and I can say that it's very, very, very, very difficult to design an MFT lens that is unsharp even at the edges. When the edges are unsharp on an MFT lens, there is usually a compromise somewhere in the design, like prioritising ridiculous centre sharpness, giving extra background blur, etc.
stabilization is no where near as good as Olympus

So 6 / 7 stops on a Fuji is no where near the same as on a Olympus.
CIPA stabilisation is just stamped by the manufacturers, like IP ratings. Independent testing in the EU and even in Japan place majority of the 35mm and APS-C cameras at around 4.5 to 5 stops only, not the 6, 7 or 8 stops that many manufacturers are claiming. Olympus even under-rated their IBIS as laboratories even place the E-M1 II at 8 stops stills IBIS body only! I can't find the links but they are in Japanese or from a certain country whose servers are unacceptable at the moment due to a certain geopolitical incident. One can do it at home, by the way. CIPA IBIS ratings are published online.
 
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