Challenge! Today 516

wee-pics

Hall of Famer
Location
Germany
Real Name
Walter
P8218333.1.JPG
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MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
Quite cool, Matt.

And musically rather hysterical at moments. Like when the accordion player starts playing lines that are half New Orleans zydeco, and half Mexican or Tex-Mex norteño - or when the banjo player starts channeling Bela Fleck.

I also (confession follows) can't believe my own musical ignorance - having never heard Steve'n'Seagulls before. Damn. So, once more, many many thanxxx for broadening my musical horizons!
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
Quite cool, Matt.

And musically rather hysterical at moments. Like when the accordion player starts playing lines that are half New Orleans zydeco, and half Mexican or Tex-Mex norteño - or when the banjo player starts channeling Bela Fleck.

I also (confession follows) can't believe my own musical ignorance - having never heard Steve'n'Seagulls before. Damn. So, once more, many many thanxxx for broadening my musical horizons!
I'm sure I've used them before - but I don't expect everyone to listen to everything, so it's legitimate to have missed them.

However, I think as long as they to their "live" thing, they're fantastic and always worth a listen. Like other bands, if they enter the music industry's usual circus, they tend to be smoothed over and over-produced; thankfully, most of their YouTube stuff is untainted ...

M.
 

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Location
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Real Name
Miguel Tejada-Flores
Fooling around this morning with the Macro Mode on my small-sensor X30 - and my subject is a close angle on the Shift - and 'Floating Shift' - keys of the ancient Smith & Corona typewriter that belonged to my late Aunt, a writer and historian.

X30_Aug29_21_Floating_Shift.jpg
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When shift keys were invented for typewriters, they originally shifted the cylinder, or platen, to be struck in a new position by the capital letters on a typebar. But the "Floating Shift" moved the typebars up and down instead, allowing for a smoother - and supposedly much quieter - typing action. Of course, none of this now seemingly ancient mechanical technology has survived in the keys on the laptops or desktop computers that many of us use - but I must confess to an endless fascination regarding the ongoing evolution of writing tools.
 
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