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Waterfalls of the New River Gorge (photo heavy)

tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
124
Scott Depot, WV, USA
I took my recently acquired X-E1 + 14mm f/2.8 out hiking for the first time today. West Virginia's New River Gorge has many waterfalls on the creeks that roar out of its ravines. Many of those waterfalls are quite difficult - and even dangerous - to reach. I leave the dangerous trails to the daredevils, but I'm not above scrambling up and down steep, rocky embankments for a good photo or two.

Today's trek started out promising enough, with a beautiful sunrise and a soft, hazy blue sky with clouds. Inclement weather was predicted for later, but it caught up to me. By the time I made it to my second to last waterfall, the skies opened up. Good thing I had my hiking waterproof jacket. I was sheltering the X-E1 under my rain hood for the last few shots.

TT

A small waterfall on Laurel Creek. Not sure what the purpose of the building was:
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Wolf Creek, with a trail crossing in the background:
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Looking down at the top of Wolf Creek Falls:
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Looking upstream from the top of Wolf Creek Falls:
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The view from below. This was very difficult to reach:
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Lower Falls of Laurel Creek, another difficult climb into a ravine. Even the 14mm couldn't capture the whole scene, as I was standing right at the base of the main cascade:
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Upper Falls of Laurel Creek. This was the best view I could get. The climb down to the base of the falls is precarious, with many large, wet rocks. I didn't feel the risk was worth it:
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65 foot Cathedral Falls. This one is drive-up accessible, but there's also a trail that climbs the cliff to the top of the falls for the daring:
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tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
124
Scott Depot, WV, USA
These are really nice shots. The greens are rich, nice details in the shadows, great corner to corner sharpness. Did you do a set like this recently over at m43? If so, I like this better. If it wasn't you, I still like this set better.

I recently got a used 14mm and really like it. I was having a hard time deciding on what my hiking/backpacking kit would be with Fuji. I think I have decided on using the 14, 23, and Zeiss 50mm macro.
Thanks Dan. That set at m43 was indeed me, taken in many of the same spots a few weeks ago, using an E-M1 and Zuiko 4/3 14-54 Mk II. I also like the images from the Fuji better.

I've been working on selling off most of my photography gear. If I'm successful, all I'll have left when I'm done is the X-E1 and an Olympus 35RC film camera. I'll probably pick up the 35mm f/2 WR, and a very small bag to carry everything. I was going to keep my E-M5 with the Olympus 17/1.8, but I want to go as minimalist as possible.

Tony
 
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tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
124
Scott Depot, WV, USA
A few more from today with the X-E1 and 14mm/2.8. The following waterways all feed into the Bluestone, which is a tributary of the New River.

Mash Fork Falls. Both times I've visited here it has been overcast and dreary. <sigh>
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Campbell Falls, on Camp Creek.
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This waterfall doesn't seem to have a name, but it's about 1/4 mile upstream from Campbell Falls.
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Brush Creek Falls. Some sources say it is 33 feet tall, others 20-something. I'd go with #2. Wouldn't want to fall off, either way. Interesting that there's an old wall built against the bank on the opposite side of the falls. Purpose?
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White Oak Creek tumbles from way on top of the mountainside by way of a series of rocky cascades, before joining the Bluestone.
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Finally, the Bluestone, one of many large tributaries that flow into the New.
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tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
124
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Back with another waterfall pic from one of the many tributaries that tumble off the steep slopes of the New River Gorge. This is Mill Creek Falls, another difficult climb down into a ravine. There has actually been a death at these falls, where someone fell from the overlook on the upper right. Taken with a Fuji X30.

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KillRamsey

Super Moderator
Jun 20, 2012
124
Hood River, OR
I like these - reminds me of al the waterfalls I keep finding out here.

As for hiking lenses, I think the 27 pancake is my favorite, if only because it's so dern tiny. After that, it's a tie between the 23, the 18-55, or the rok 12. The kit zoom "does everything," and with OIS turned off it's sharp. So in dusty, wet, dirty situations, I tend to go with that so I'm not opening up the body. Sometimes I just grab the rokinon 12, because those crazy angles and vignetting tend to make really unique, memorable pictures. If I'm in a logical mood, it's the 23 f1.4 with a polarizing filter on it.
 

tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
124
Scott Depot, WV, USA
I like these - reminds me of al the waterfalls I keep finding out here.
Kyle, we have a lot of nice waterfalls, and some are very difficult - even dangerous - to reach. However, I've never seen anything here like some of the massive Oregon waterfalls I've seen in photos.

Here we go with some more waterfall pics from my latest foray into the Gorge. It was solidly overcast all morning, and the sky finally broke open for some great October clouds & sun later in the afternoon . . . after I had made most of my stops. I did get a few roadside images on the way home.

Wolf Creek, with the Kaymoor crossing in the distance. I expect these to be my last photos of this place, as the climb down the ravine is quite difficult, and the top of a huge waterfall was just to the left and behind the big rock on which I was standing. I'm getting too old to be taking such risks:
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Wolf Creek Falls, over 20 feet tall. The photo above was taken just out of sight on a rock in the upper right of this image:
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Another view of Wolf Creek Falls. It was physically impossible to step any farther back to get the whole scene in one frame with the X30. Without the Rhododendron thickets growing along the canyon wall, it would be impossible to get to the base of the falls for images like these:
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Close-up of the Kaymoor Trail crossing from the first photo in this post. The trail is closed beyond the bridge due to an unstable slope. Lots of slippages on these steep slopes:
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Upper Marr Branch Fall from along the road. The view from below the falls is much better, but after Wolf Creek, I didn't feel like scrambling over more wet rocks down into a steep ravine:
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Another Glade Creek, this one on the opposite side of the river, in the adjacent county:
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Glade Creek again. The sun finally makes its appearance in the afternoon . . . near the end of my hike, and my return trip home:
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Climbing back up WV 41 on the north side of the canyon, I came across this scene on the side of the road. Don't know if it has a name:
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Britanica

Veteran
Sep 22, 2016
43
Photo heavy? You weren't kidding around! haha These are really lovely. Would you mind if I snagged a few for wallpapers (personal use)? I like to change them with the seasons. Makes my miserable life indoors a little easier haha
 

unstable_rider

Regular
Apr 2, 2017
28
USA Minnesota
Beautiful pictures and a wonderful geographic area. Never been down that way, but it looks prime for a good hike. +1 for the ole X-E1. For me, it's the Fuji body I bought twice :doh:.
Always a reliable performer.

I got my 2nd one for around $279 brand new (import model). It's worth twice that to me based on it's performance.
 

tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
124
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Thanks. It is truly a magnificent area for all kinds of outdoor adventures. I agree the X-E1 is a good camera, but I decided to sell mine and keep only the X-T1.
 
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Britanica

Veteran
Sep 22, 2016
43
I don't want you to think I am being over-board with the comments but I could and would seriously frame and hang these in my house. You get such great angles!
 

tonyturley

Hall of Famer
Nov 24, 2014
124
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Revisiting my old thread with a few images from this weekend, Laurel Creek again:

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A few miles downstream with a telephoto look at Cathedral Falls:

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Jock Elliott

Hall of Famer
Jan 3, 2012
124
Troy, NY
I took my recently acquired X-E1 + 14mm f/2.8 out hiking for the first time today. West Virginia's New River Gorge has many waterfalls on the creeks that roar out of its ravines. Many of those waterfalls are quite difficult - and even dangerous - to reach. I leave the dangerous trails to the daredevils, but I'm not above scrambling up and down steep, rocky embankments for a good photo or two.

Today's trek started out promising enough, with a beautiful sunrise and a soft, hazy blue sky with clouds. Inclement weather was predicted for later, but it caught up to me. By the time I made it to my second to last waterfall, the skies opened up. Good thing I had my hiking waterproof jacket. I was sheltering the X-E1 under my rain hood for the last few shots.

TT

A small waterfall on Laurel Creek. Not sure what the purpose of the building was:
View attachment 152836

Wolf Creek, with a trail crossing in the background:
View attachment 152837

Looking down at the top of Wolf Creek Falls:
View attachment 152838

Looking upstream from the top of Wolf Creek Falls:
View attachment 152839

The view from below. This was very difficult to reach:
View attachment 152840

Lower Falls of Laurel Creek, another difficult climb into a ravine. Even the 14mm couldn't capture the whole scene, as I was standing right at the base of the main cascade:
View attachment 152841
View attachment 152842

Upper Falls of Laurel Creek. This was the best view I could get. The climb down to the base of the falls is precarious, with many large, wet rocks. I didn't feel the risk was worth it:
View attachment 152843

65 foot Cathedral Falls. This one is drive-up accessible, but there's also a trail that climbs the cliff to the top of the falls for the daring:
View attachment 152844
Lovely, just lovely.

Cheers, Jock
 

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