What do you do for a living? AKA, how do you finance your gear? :)

MiguelATF

Hall of Famer
Aug 27, 2013
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Miguel Tejada-Flores
Of course, thanks for asking :)
Here is the link to a gallery of some of my illustrations on my site:
You can browse the comics as well, although under the category BD (bande dessiné stands for comics in French) or by their respective titles.
All I can say is.... Damn, Milan! you are (and have been) doing some.....seriously cool s**t! (There's really no other way to say it that comes close) I'm going to keep looking because, obviously, there is (and are) some work (and works) here that need a more focused viewing (or series of repeated viewings) .... to appreciate. Bravo, dude!
 

bartjeej

Hall of Famer
Nov 12, 2010
bart
Reading your description of what you do and have done, Bart....doesn't sound boring to me at all: it sounds positively riveting. Never a dull moment, as the saying goes ;)
Well, the only boring moments are when we have to engage in the bureaucracy around investigations - filling out forms to request certain authorities (for instance requesting a warrant), and writing files describing our findings (especially when they're actually non-findings).

That's boring, but necessary - after all, we get to do things on behalf of society that can really invade peoples privacy and have major consequences, such as confisquation of assets, jail time, and a permanently changed public image. It's only right that we are transparent and can be held accountable for the way in which we apply our powers.
 

Steve Noel

All-Pro
Oct 5, 2010
Casey County, KY
"Jack of all trades, master of none", I've heard since I was a small child. (my dad's quote) But, I am the picture in the dictionary, used to illustrate the concept.
Grew up on a small farm in hill country of Kentucky, looking at the rear end of mules, until 16, when I left home.
Worked in timber and construction related jobs, until Bible college, where I worked for General Motors for 4 years. From there it was ministry, as pastor/missionary, but still working at many trades, to support the family. Construction, mechanic (auto and aircraft), equipment operator (dozer, crane, grader, loaders, etc), OTR trucking, and the list is endless.
Congestive heart failure at age 62, ended all that. I still spend a bit of time in my hobby, wood working shop.
Spent quite a lot of money during my working years on photography. Now have one camera body (OMD E-M5) , with P-20 and couple old MF lenses.
If you've read this far, you must be a very curious person, or very bored with the Covid-19 event-less life. :biggrin:
 

Kevin

Code Monkey 🐒
Nov 3, 2018
drd: the more important question is, did you see the Wire? ;-) I'm a financial investigator at the police, a bit like Lester Freamon in that show...

Used to work at two of the big 4 accounting firms, doing tax returns and tax accounting mostly for international companies using the Netherlands as a tax haven :-( but i always saw it as a way of gaining the experience necessary for getting my dream job, which is what i have now.

I investigate everything from bankruptcy fraud to laundered drug money and from calculating the proceeds of environmental crime to financial crumbs that might lead us to a kidnapper... Occasionally a murder case to see if there is a financial motive, to find a suspects location, or to confiscate money to be given to the victims relatives. It's a lot of numbers and spreadsheets and legal documentd, in short the things that most people find dreadfully boring... but first of all, even when I take a shower I tend to think in numbers or in abstract concepts applying to whatever situation is on my mind, and secondly, the subject matter just makes it absolutely thrilling. So I'm having a blast!
It is now ingrained in my head to picture bartjeej as the "The Suit" from the White Collar TV 📺 show. :D
 
Apr 18, 2014
Boston Burbs
David
I worked in IT until I rose up to a senior development manager in healthcare software systems. But I went up too far, I didn't hit the Peter Principle, I just didn't like what I was doing. Pushing paper and meetings about what to do or say at the next meeting were not what I wanted to do. I'd gotten seriously into photography a few years before taking pictures of my kids at various sporting events and decided to go to the now closed Center for Digital Imaging Arts at Boston University.

I ended up leaving IT and becoming an event Pro for about a dozen years. It was handy to be able to write off a Nikon 70-200 f/2.8 or D800 as a business expense. And it was handy to be available around my kids event schedules during the week as most of my events were on the weekend. But for the last few years I've been back part time in IT and trying my hand at other stuff (and my kids are in their mid to late 20's so....).

I've also done pretty well at buying and selling gear for fun (and being a techie, just to try new things), which has been a lot easier with m4/3 and Fuji gear than when I was doing it with Nikon gear.

.......Used to work at two of the big 4 accounting firms, doing tax returns and tax accounting mostly for international companies using the Netherlands as a tax haven :-( but i always saw it as a way of gaining the experience necessary for getting my dream job, which is what i have now........
They were still the Big 8 when I worked for one of them, I feel old......

Freelance bum. I haven't had a normal job in over 15 years!
Beat me by a year. I haven't had a normal FULL TIME job since April 2006.

Of course, thanks for asking :)
Here is the link to a gallery of some of my illustrations on my site:
You can browse the comics as well, although under the category BD (bande dessiné stands for comics in French) or by their respective titles.
Well just DANG that $#!+'s GOOD.
 

donlaw

Hall of Famer
Sep 14, 2012
Texas
Don
In a former life I was a clinically trained person (radiography - doing photos with x-ray, ultrasound, and magnetic fields). While working in hospitals and clinics I went back to school. Starting at university as a photojournalist major but rather quickly (1.5yrs) became disillusioned by the size of the classes, and the general realization that I would never work for a prestigious publication like National Geographic.
So I switched majors to architecture. I went directly from there into healthcare facility design. My work these days consists mainly of front end consulting for large healthcare projects. Since the lock down, I have been involved in helping some of clients adapt for Covid...as well as continuing to work on some new healthcare facilities. Interesting how we will be approaching some future design concepts on the basis of Covid.

But since I have raised and autistic son into an adult, my favorite project in this one:
Thompson Autism Center at CHOC
 

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