What's max. allowed speed at your place?

Herman

The Image Stimulator
Jul 11, 2010
123
The Netherlands
Herman
I live in the centre of a small touristic art town locoted in the eastern part of The Netherlands near German border.
Max. speed here is 30 km/hr.
Outside centre it's 50 km/h.
 

Will

All-Pro
Aug 30, 2010
123
England
20 or 30mph around town, 50 or 60mph on the roads outside town and 70mph on dual carriage ways and motorways, but the Government are talking about increasing the maximum speed limit to 80mph.
 

BillN

Hall of Famer
Aug 25, 2010
123
S W France
Bill
in France

30 kph - certain town and village sectors

50 kph - max "in town" roads - outside towns

70 kph - certain roads

90 kph - outside towns max on single carriageways

110 kph - dual carriageways (non Mway)

110 kph - Mways when raining

130 kph = Mways - not raining

lots of automatic cameras now in France and the Government are collecting loads of Euros from "flashing"
 

bilzmale

Super Moderator Emeritus
Jul 17, 2010
124
Perth, Western Australia
Bill Shinnick
In Australia:-
40 kph in school zones
50 kph in built up areas
60-80 kph on major roads
100 kph on freeways
110 kph maximum on highways (except Northern Territory 130 kph).

Until recently there was no maximum speed on NT highways - many territorians want that reinstated.
 

retow

All-Pro
Jul 24, 2010
123
And cars get more powerful, heavier, bulkier and faster every year. I'm a car fan, always was, but I start to believe limiting weight and engine size for cars could make sense. I think setting some boundaries would boost innovation and not make man's favorite toy less attractive.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BBW

BBW

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 7, 2010
123
betwixt and between
BB
Sounds like a really good plan to me, retow. Of course my main driver is a MINI Cooper. I often feel as though I am a tiny gazelle lost amidst a giant herd of wildebeests.

In town, 30 mph, in school zones 20 mph. On most highways it's posted as 55 mph or 65 mph on one highway nearby...that all translates into a range between 65 to 80 mph in reality for most.

P.S. for those of us who don't use the same measurements: http://www.convertunits.com/from/kph/to/mph
 

Will

All-Pro
Aug 30, 2010
123
England
BB I used to drive an old mini countryman and they were even smaller than the new ones! But since all the other cars are bigger now as well I imagine it feels just as insecure sometimes.

Not my car but you get the idea.
View attachment 43394
mini by meaning_of_light, on Flickr

I got stuck behind this fast moving vehicle near my place on Saturday, had my GRD3 to hand as usual.
View attachment 43395
R0017486ac by meaning_of_light, on Flickr
 
  • Like
Reactions: BBW

BigTam

Regular
Jun 23, 2011
43
Dortmund, Germany
Ron
Our small residential street is limited to 30 Km/h = 20 mph. Most city roads are 50 km/h = 30 mph. And the Autobahn 5 minutes drive away is 100 km/h = 65 mph because it's near a major intersection. Further south, beyond the intersection, it has no limit. You can drive at (say) 200 km/h = 125 mph, but watch your rear mirrors: a Porsche may be coming up at over 250 km/h = 155 mph ...

I have only once driven at over 250 km/h, but my normal cruising speed on longer trips was 180 - 200 km/h. Anything more demanded too much concentration, or was impossible because of traffic density.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BBW

BBW

Administrator Emeritus
Jul 7, 2010
123
betwixt and between
BB
We are so slow over here compared to you! Of course our highways, at least in the congested areas, are completely unsuitable for such speeds. I think in parts of Texas and out in Wyoming and other western states that the speed limits can be much higher that they are on the eastern seaboard.

Nice shots, Will!:biggrin:
 

BillN

Hall of Famer
Aug 25, 2010
123
S W France
Bill
since (retirement) I watch the fuel gauge as much as the speedo

driving my Skoda Yeti, (4x4 with the 2 litre VW 140bhp Diesel engine), at around 100/110 kmh, (say 65 to 70 mph), on the Autoroute/Motorway/Freeway - I get 50 miles per Imperial, (UK) gallon, which would be 42 miles per US gallon, (an Imperial gallon is 1.2 US gallons, I believe) - which would be about 17 kms per litre

Driving at 130 kmh, (82 mph), the consumption drops to below 40 mpg - i.e. the car uses just over 20% more fuel - and to tell you the truth the drive is far less stressful and journey time are hardly any longer.

The Yeti is about as aerodynamic as a "house brick" so speeds about at 75 mph really do use up "the juice"
 
  • Like
Reactions: BBW

avidone

Regular
Oct 12, 2011
18
Rome, Italy
speed limit? what does that mean? I think I saw some signs about that somewhere, but in Rome and anywhere in Italy further South, such silly things are ignored, along with no-parking zones, pedestrian crossings, etc. Also, the cars they sell here do not seem to come with turn signals. Can you tell I am a disgruntled foreigner who moves around on foot (and public transport)?
 
  • Like
Reactions: BBW

silverbullet

Regular
Oct 20, 2010
43
Germany
BB I used to drive an old mini countryman and they were even smaller than the new ones! But since all the other cars are bigger now as well I imagine it feels just as insecure sometimes.

Not my car but you get the idea.
View attachment 43404
mini by meaning_of_light, on Flickr

I got stuck behind this fast moving vehicle near my place on Saturday, had my GRD3 to hand as usual.
View attachment 43405
R0017486ac by meaning_of_light, on Flickr

ahhhh, that's the same in offshore power boat racing:

Person A: navigator and helmsman
Person B: the throttleman

....and I can easily see some charcoal on your lens or sensor????? ;-)
 

olli

Super Moderator Emeritus
Sep 28, 2010
123
Sofia, Bulgaria
olli
Our small residential street is limited to 30 Km/h = 20 mph. Most city roads are 50 km/h = 30 mph. And the Autobahn 5 minutes drive away is 100 km/h = 65 mph because it's near a major intersection. Further south, beyond the intersection, it has no limit. You can drive at (say) 200 km/h = 125 mph, but watch your rear mirrors: a Porsche may be coming up at over 250 km/h = 155 mph ...
I know how this feels. When we lived in Munich there were plenty of sections of the nearby A-bahns that had no limit. coming from the UK it was really disconcerting. When you check your mirror in the UK the guy coming up behind you is doing 70-8- MPH - maybe a little more - but the guy on an A-bahn doing 120-130 in his Porsche/M-B/BMW is terrifying. You instinctively judge how much time you have before the guy doing 70-80 is going to be alongside you, but it's impossible to judge the guy doing 120. I never got used to trying to judge how safe it was to overtake on the A-bahns where there was no limit.
 
  • Like
Reactions: BBW

silverbullet

Regular
Oct 20, 2010
43
Germany
On the german autobahn there is simply one Darwin's law:

Porsche eats BMW, BMW eats Mercedes, Merdedes eats Audi, Audi eats VW, VW eats Skoda, Skoda eats Hyundai, Hyundai eats Lada........

When I'm heading the Atlantic ocean through France, life is easy with cruise control and 130 km/h max. speed.......

The only disadvantage is that french drivers do overtake you with their cruise control adjusted just only 1.36789 km/h faster than you. When I'm on the right side and a truck is at the horizont, it's fascinating that the french drivers block you even the 3. track is empty when the trailer is directly in front of you......

The speed limit of 130 km/h in France is ok for me, only the 110 km/h while raining is boring in the country of Michelin, the best tyre under the sun........
 
  • Like
Reactions: BBW

Will

All-Pro
Aug 30, 2010
123
England
:biggrin:
ahhhh, that's the same in offshore power boat racing:

Person A: navigator and helmsman
Person B: the throttleman

....and I can easily see some charcoal on your lens or sensor????? ;-)
hehe
It is a Cambridge science park research project to develop a carbon neutral transport system. Apparently they have just discovered that it is possible to power a vehicle with charcoal and water!!
What will they think of next? :confused::biggrin::p
 
  • Like
Reactions: BBW

BigTam

Regular
Jun 23, 2011
43
Dortmund, Germany
Ron
I used to drive 50.000 km a year, mostly in Germany, but also in Denmark, Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland and Austria. Occasionally in France and England. When you drive that much, you do get used to it. More dangerous was when you yourself were doing 200 km/h and someone doing just 100 km/h pulls out in front - good brakes essential :)

But abroad I always set the cruise control: some countries have very high fines for speeding.
 

Latest posts

Latest threads

Top Bottom