When people like your shots, and assume it's your gear

Tilman Paulin

Top Veteran
Nov 15, 2011
Vancouver B.C.
Tilman
Sorry for going back to the original topic :) ...
I just had the thought that we're doing the same thing to ourselves a lot of times...
We're sitting at home, reading about the latest gear, looking at great photos someone took with the latest Fuji, Sony, ... and start thinking that we want/need that camera too. Then our photos would look as nice as well :)

In my case, the m43 gear I have is great. It's pretty fantastic, especially if you compare it against what millions of photographers have been taking photos with in the last 100 years :) And still... everyone's excited about that new Sony, etc., etc., etc. :)

Thom Hogan has an interesting post about this today. Might be helpful for some to resist those holiday "bargains"
http://www.dslrbodies.com/newsviews/ultimately-only-you-are-the.html

Go out, take photos with whatever gear you have, and have a drink :drinks:
 

Luckypenguin

Hall of Famer
Dec 24, 2010
Brisbane, Australia
Nic
So the meetup went well. We had abut three hours, and just hung out at his place drinking beer. I immediately grabbed a pen and paper, and drew out a series of 3 single-axis graphs... one for apertures (with size-accurate circles and labels), one for shutter speeds, and one for ISO. I then explained what happens to the exposure as you go up and down each scale. Then, I explained the trade-offs with each of them -- DOF and other glass issues at each end of the aperture scale, then the 2 kinds of blur on the the shutter speed scale (camera shake, subject motion), and finally noise on ISO. That led to explaining what "stops" are, which led to the EV Comp knob. Then I demonstrated DOF and camera shake with the xf 35 lens, and then he walked around and shot things and asked questions.

He's better than I hoped. He once shot film, like me, and developed film in school, like me. So he's where I was about 3 years ago. I explained why I didn't get the kit zoom, why I now regret it, and why he absolutely should. Then I put all my wet gear back on and biked home in the cold rain. I had a really good time.
This is now where you need to have "the talk" with him. While it's great to research, try, and eventually buy a good quality camera, is he actually going to take it out, carry it, and really use after the honeymoon period? I've probably convinced more people to not buy a larger system camera by making them ask themselves that question. I'm also not a salesman, nor a representative of any brand that I personally prefer to use.
 

john m flores

All-Pro
Aug 13, 2012
This is now where you need to have "the talk" with him. While it's great to research, try, and eventually buy a good quality camera, is he actually going to take it out, carry it, and really use after the honeymoon period? I've probably convinced more people to not buy a larger system camera by making them ask themselves that question. I'm also not a salesman, nor a representative of any brand that I personally prefer to use.
Great point. A lot of folks come to me for camera advice. I give them the standard sage advice–spend more money on glass than bodies, buy something reasonable to start, take a class, etc… To date, just one person has followed my advice, starting with a K-x. The rest? One went straight to a Canon 7D, the other straight from a smartphone to a Nikon D7000 with kit lens, neither of which get used much AFAIK. Another went from nothing to a K-7 with kit lens. Each when those cameras were at their price peak.

For these folks, the one thing I hear over and over is that they want something that will last and they approach it much like a computer–get the most expensive that you can afford and don't upgrade until you absolutely have to.

It's like the opposite of GAS. It's Camerastipation.
 

RT Panther

All-Pro
Dec 25, 2012
Great point. A lot of folks come to me for camera advice. I give them the standard sage advice–spend more money on glass than bodies, .
This is where I like my Dƒ's ability to use & properly meter older Nikon glass going back to the 1950s. So yep, I've spent "more" on glass - but in my unique case, it's 1950s-1970s glass. :)
 

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