Where to connect strap when using a larger zoom

Brownie

Top Veteran
I sent an email off to Peak Design to ask about one of their wrist straps. I want to use it as a safety strap in case the camera gets knocked out of my hand or dropped. I asked them if it was long enough to connect to the tripod mount on a zoom so there wouldn't be excessive weight on the lens mount. Their response:

Thanks for reaching out! The stress on the mount will actually be greater if you attach it to the lens foot vs the camera, so would be advise to attach Cuff to the lug of the camera as designed

This is opposite what I've been taught and flies in the face of logic. The weight and length of the lens would put a lot of stress on the mount if it were to drop. But, hey...they're the experts. Or are they?

What say you?
 

DeeJayK

Top Veteran
Location
Seattle, WA, USA
Name
Keith
I sent an email off to Peak Design to ask about one of their wrist straps. I want to use it as a safety strap in case the camera gets knocked out of my hand or dropped. I asked them if it was long enough to connect to the tripod mount on a zoom so there wouldn't be excessive weight on the lens mount. Their response:



This is opposite what I've been taught and flies in the face of logic. The weight and length of the lens would put a lot of stress on the mount if it were to drop. But, hey...they're the experts. Or are they?

What say you?
I'm no expert, but logic would lead me to think that you'd want the strap connected to the item with more mass if you're interested in minimizing stress on the mount.

- K
 

Iron

All-Pro
Location
New Zealand
Name
Tímo
Check out Op/Tech: Lens Loops™. You can attach it to whatever OP/Tech strap you want but a Utility Strap/Sling just makes sense.
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The brand is my go-to just because they last and made in the USA.

Regarding straps, I prefer the brand just because they're comfortable and really sturdy. Some people have been using their classic strap for 30 years already.
 

Brownie

Top Veteran
I'm not sure they really understood what you were asking really. If this were true would manufacturers make lenses with feet?
I thought about responding as such but decided against it. My question was pretty straight forward.

i.e. Did you understand it here? Then they understood it there!
 

Brownie

Top Veteran
Check out Op/Tech: Lens Loops™. You can attach it to whatever OP/Tech strap you want but a Utility Strap/Sling just makes sense.
View attachment 299861

The brand is my go-to just because they last and made in the USA.

Regarding straps, I prefer the brand just because they're comfortable and really sturdy. Some people have been using their classic strap for 30 years already.
Interesting, but I'd never trust one of those plastic pinch-to-release buckles. I've had one fail in another application.
 

DeeJayK

Top Veteran
Location
Seattle, WA, USA
Name
Keith
To answer your initial question, I don't think the Cuff is long enough to comfortably attach to the foot of most lenses. I can dig mine out along with the Oly 50-200 (my only lens with a foot) and give it a shot if it would help.

- K
 

Iron

All-Pro
Location
New Zealand
Name
Tímo
Interesting, but I'd never trust one of those plastic pinch-to-release buckles. I've had one fail in another application.
Me too, until I found the brand. I believe they use a different plastic grade vs most buckles that we see around. Their QD buckles are tested to 66 kg tensile strength, much more than any other brand offers. The demo we had from our supplier here tested the tensile strength to break at 70 kg!
 

DeeJayK

Top Veteran
Location
Seattle, WA, USA
Name
Keith
Me too, until I found the brand. I believe they use a different plastic grade vs most buckles that we see around. Their QD buckles are tested to 66 kg tensile strength, much more than any other brand offers. The demo we had from our supplier here tested the tensile strength to break at 70 kg!
I agree that I'd trust Op/Tech buckles a LOT more than your run of the mill plastic buckle produced offshore by the lowest bidder. But, I've seen enough broken plastic buckles (not Op/Tech) for it to give me pause as well.

I also wonder about the durability of even quality plastic buckles over time. After it's been snapped and unsnapped hundreds of times, does that stress compound? What about environmental damage from sunlight or heat? I'd worry about the degradation that would cause.

That said, I trust hanging my camera off the thin Peak Design anchors. That might not be any more durable.

- K
 

Brownie

Top Veteran
To answer your initial question, I don't think the Cuff is long enough to comfortably attach to the foot of most lenses. I can dig mine out along with the Oly 50-200 (my only lens with a foot) and give it a shot if it would help.

- K
That would be appreciated. I was thinking too about a bracket that attaches from the lens foot to the tripod mount on the camera, then attaching the cuff to that somewhere. That would actually be the best of everything.
Me too, until I found the brand. I believe they use a different plastic grade vs most buckles that we see around. Their QD buckles are tested to 66 kg tensile strength, much more than any other brand offers. The demo we had from our supplier here tested the tensile strength to break at 70 kg!
I'll take a good look, thanks.
That said, I trust hanging my camera off the thin Peak Design anchors. That might not be any more durable.

- K
Me too now that you mention it... :unsure:

I think the difference for me is that PD anchors pull to latch, whereas the other style pulls to release.
 

DeeJayK

Top Veteran
Location
Seattle, WA, USA
Name
Keith
That would be appreciated. I was thinking too about a bracket that attaches from the lens foot to the tripod mount on the camera, then attaching the cuff to that somewhere. That would actually be the best of everything.
I'll pull them out this evening and give it a shot

I think the difference for me is that PD anchors pull to latch, whereas the other style pulls to release.
I wouldn't be so worried about the PD latch mechanism design itself (for the reason you note), but rather the anchor elements themselves and particularly the thin-looking cord that loops through the attachment points. It's probably fine, but it just felt a little odd to be going on about the strength of plastic buckles without also interrogating my own practices a bit.

- K
 

Brownie

Top Veteran
I'll pull them out this evening and give it a shot


I wouldn't be so worried about the PD latch mechanism design itself (for the reason you note), but rather the anchor elements themselves and particularly the thin-looking cord that loops through the attachment points. It's probably fine, but it just felt a little odd to be going on about the strength of plastic buckles without also interrogating my own practices a bit.

- K
According to PD, those anchors have been tested to 300lbs. I think I'm less worried about the cord than I am the plastic anchors!
 

Darmok N Jalad

There are FOUR LIGHTS!
Location
Tanagra
In regard to plastic, so much depends on the quality of the material used, and how it is applied in the design. For what it’s worth, I’ve seen 2 metal buckles fail in low-duty applications—a buckle on a kid‘s shoe, and the buckle on kid’s overalls. The metal on both just sheered off. The one of the overalls just broke while bouncing around in the wash. I suspect the quality of the material was to blame, as usually one would expect the metal parts of clothing to be the least likely to fail.

Bringing that thought around, isn’t that one of complaints against the PL100-400? It’s a mostly metal exterior, with plastic inner workings. The lens mount is metal, mounted to plastic, connected back to metal, and sheering off at the lens mount is quite possible if the lens+body takes a big hit.
 

Brownie

Top Veteran
Bringing that thought around, isn’t that one of complaints against the PL100-400? It’s a mostly metal exterior, with plastic inner workings. The lens mount is metal, mounted to plastic, connected back to metal, and sheering off at the lens mount is quite possible if the lens+body takes a big hit.
This is for a Sigma 100-400 on a Sony.

I think I have some of this sorted out. A short slide bar connected to both the camera and lens will let me put a strap, cuff, or whatever in any position I want and maintain a solid mount that would stress neither in case of a drop. Downside is it would be a pain in the butt to change lenses. Oops! Better buy another camera!
 
When I had my oly 100-400 I attached a peak design strap to the tripod foot on the lens. My Sigma 150-600 has 2 slots in the tripod foot to thread an included strap, which is how I carry it. Carrying it by the camera lugs with a heavy long lens makes zero sense to me whatsoever, but we live in uncharted times.
 

Brownie

Top Veteran
When I had my oly 100-400 I attached a peak design strap to the tripod foot on the lens. My Sigma 150-600 has 2 slots in the tripod foot to thread an included strap, which is how I carry it. Carrying it by the camera lugs with a heavy long lens makes zero sense to me whatsoever, but we live in uncharted times.
Exactly. And it could be worse strain yet for this use. It seems like mounting to both would be the safest with a large heavy lens.

When I'm at the drag strip I can end up standing by the track for hours at a time. It can be hot and sweaty making a strap uncomfortable. My daughter bought me a PD Capture for Christmas and I plan to use that to 'hold' the camera and rest my hands while waiting for the many things we wait for out there. Without a strap, if I were to drop the camera there'd be nothing to stop it. Worse yet, if I were to drop it on the other side of the wall...:eek:

Enter the PD Cuff. What I like about this option is you wear the cuff loose, but in the event of a drop it cinches itself tight. What I don't like is what appears in the video to be an 8"-10" drop. That coupled with a heavy lens could be a problem.

Watch this from about 2:15, he demonstrates the cinch action.

 
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