Where to connect strap when using a larger zoom

John King

Member of SOFA
Location
Beaumaris, Melbourne, Australia
Name
John ...
They sell beer at the track, but not for those of us standing right next to it...

I use a monopod or small tripod quite a bit, but in different settings. I usually have a shoulder strap. It's not as much about weight on my shoulders as it is heat and sweat. If there's a long delay I usually find a shady spot, sit my butt on the ground and start culling in-camera. Plus, I won't be able to use the capture clip if there's a monopod on the camera.
With my E-30 or others and my FTs 50-200 (1.2 kgs), I often use my Benro A49T monopod with Manfrotto 322 RC2 grip ball head. When walking about, I just sling it over my shoulder.
 

DeeJayK

Top Veteran
Location
Seattle, WA, USA
Name
Keith
I tried attaching my PD Cuff to the tripod foot of my O50-200 lens attached to my E-M1, which is as close as I have to the gear you're planning to use.

To my mild surprise the setup works okay. My fear was that the tripod foot would be so far from the grip position that it would take up all the slack in the Cuff and be constraining, but that didn't seem to be an issue.

But if your lens is significantly longer than this one with the foot placed further from the mount to reach the center of gravity, that might become a problem. Similarly if your wrist is significantly thicker than mine, that could take up some of the slack.

Some pics:
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- K
 
Last edited:
Location
Vancouver BC
Name
Graham
but that's with other attachments right? I carry it as is, much easier to carry. I don't want to go off topic. I wish some pics are forthcoming from carbonman
@lucien, look at my original post again. I added a photo of my setup to it. I use the same Capture Plate on the bottom of the camera as on the tripod collar mount - you can see the edge of it protruding from the bottom of the camera body.
I carry the camera by the tripod collar quite often. When I shoot, the collar stays lock to the left and I use the heel of my left hand to support the lens by the tripod mount itself. My fingertips can quite easily tweak the focus, or work the zoom on the 40-150 from this position.
 
Location
Vancouver BC
Name
Graham
@DeeJayK I use a PD Clutch on my E-M1 III. The upper strap I put through the triangular neckstrap mount and the bottom of the Clutch strap I opened and stitched around the baseplate indent at the fastening rod below your hand. I can open my hand and still have contact with the grip on the camera. When using one of the long lenses I grab the tripod mount as a handle and steer the camera to my right hand so my fingers easily slip around the grip, under the Clutch.
(The camera and 300mm has a leather 'sort of' Clutch I made for the E-M1 II before I saw a Clutch in real life.)
 

lucien

Hall of Famer
I have a PD Capture Plate on the bottom of each camera body plus on the tripod socket of the 300mm f4 and 40-150mm f2.8. (The tripod mounts are rotated so the bottom of the mounts are facing 90° left. This makes the body lie with the bottom against my body.) I have the plastic Anchors attached to each of these Capture Plates plus the left side strap mount of each camera. There's a permanently mounted hand strap on the right, shutter button side of the camera body.
When shooting with a lens without a tripod mount, I use Anchor links to the camera Capture Plate and the Anchor on the left side of the body. If I have either of the long lenses mounted, the ends of the strap attach to the Capture Plates so the body lugs don't carry any of the weight.
When carrying the 150-400mm f4.5 I use Anchors on the 2 built-in mounting points of the tripod collar and carry all of the lens/camera weight with a Slide Lite strap. It makes changing everything pretty quick and easy.
Now I remember where I saw the layout before. Are you sure you don't get pulled over or stopped to inspect your rig. Aka Sniper stuff HA HA HA. It's sweeet.
 

Brownie

Top Veteran
I tried attaching my PD Cuff to the tripod foot of my O50-200 lens attached to my E-M1, which is as close as I have to the gear you're planning to use.

To my mild surprise the setup works okay. My fear was that the tripod foot would be so far from the grip position that it would take up all the slack in the Cuff and be constraining, but that didn't seem to be an issue.

But if your lens is significantly longer than this one with the foot placed further from the mount to reach the center of gravity, that might become a problem. Similarly if your wrist is significantly thicker than mine, that could take up some of the slack.
Good stuff! You echoed my concern exactly. This is a good outcome. In looking at your fist photo, I'd say the foot is quite a bit closer to the camera on mine, about 4" near as I can tell from the net. The collar is supposed to be here today so I'll know more.

Interestingly, I got a 'how'd we do' email from PD's CS. I suggested (politely) that the person who answered my question wasn't clear on the question or perhaps needed better information to share with customers. We'll see if they respond. I'd love one of their engineer's to explain their response.
 

DeeJayK

Top Veteran
Location
Seattle, WA, USA
Name
Keith
Good stuff! You echoed my concern exactly. This is a good outcome. In looking at your fist photo, I'd say the foot is quite a bit closer to the camera on mine, about 4" near as I can tell from the net. The collar is supposed to be here today so I'll know more.

Interestingly, I got a 'how'd we do' email from PD's CS. I suggested (politely) that the person who answered my question wasn't clear on the question or perhaps needed better information to share with customers. We'll see if they respond. I'd love one of their engineer's to explain their response.
It's dawning on me that some dimensions would be helpful. It's just over 3.5" from the lens mount to the tripod mount on this lens. It's roughly 7" on a diagonal from the tripod mount to the strap lug at the top of the grip.

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The Cuff itself provides about 15.5" in total length, from the anchor attachment. Subtract your wrist circumference from that to get a maximum distance from wrist to attachment point.

- K
 

Brownie

Top Veteran
I meant to measure the C2C on my setup last night but got busy putting things up for sale.

3-1/8" C2C from mount to mount and 5" from lens mount to lug. It looks like I'll have plenty of slack.
 

Brownie

Top Veteran
what are you selling out of curiosity? Which gear? Have you switched systems?
I added Sony last December and after using it awhile and coming to several conclusions (both technical and preferential), decided I don't want to mess with two systems.
  • Yes, people warned me about that, and
  • No, I didn't listen.
I'm not sorry though. So now I'm selling all of my M-4/3 kit. I purchased my second Sony FF body yesterday from a forum member.

There are some aspects of M-4/3 I'll miss, but not what most people debate about. Size doesn't bug me and in many cases isn't as different as many think. Same with cost. Mostly I'll miss specific gear. I'll miss my G9. I will miss my 12-60/3.5, that little lens is incredible. Mostly, I'll miss my PL 50-200. I have often referred to that as my 'cold dead hands' lens. I'm actually considering keeping it and picking up one of the less expensive Oly bodies. If it doesn't sell straight away I'm ok with that whilst I think on it.
 

Brownie

Top Veteran
Follow up post.

I had a 5 hour day at the track on Sunday. That's 5 hours without a break and almost no shade. I did take a water bottle! This was a shakedown cruise to see how it all worked together after advice from you guys in multiple threads.

Start off, a Peak Design 30L bag. It allows me to carry two cameras, one with the 100-400 attached and the other with a 24-105. There's room for the Tamron 17-28 and Minolta 80-200/2.8 with the A to E adapter mounted. All accessories, including a small pair of binoculars if I want them, umbrella, poncho, and other stuff.

I ended up with a Peak Design Slide Lite strap for the 100-400 camera. I was a bit concerned about the narrow strap with the weight but it turned out to be no problem. The strap is connected to the lens' tripod foot and a Basic Peak Design bottom plate on the camera in a similar configuration to what @Carbonman showed. The only difference is I wear it so the lens faces backwards. This puts the grip in a natural position for my hand and keeps the lens from banging into things. The tripod foot is rotated to the portrait position as per your suggestions. I thought I'd hate that, but it's well out of the way and I never even noticed it.

For the 24-105 camera I used a Peak Design (are you seeing a pattern here? :unsure: ) Capture Clip with the Pro Pad Stabilizer on my belt. I wasn't so sure about this going in, but man is it nice! The camera is (relatively) easy to get on and off the clip (I'll get better at it) and the extra weight on my belt was negligible. Having said that, I'm not sure I'd want a bigger lens for this setup. I will add the Peak Design (sigh) cuff to this as soon as I get one.

So, one camera on a sling hanging on my right, second one on the clip on my left side. It was easy and fast to let the one hang and grab the other when I wanted a wider FOV. So much easier (and a lot safer for the sensor) than changing lenses out in that dusty, smoky air. I carried the backpack up and down like a bag, which was pretty light with both cameras and lenses out of it. One great feature of that back pack is no waist or sternum strap if you don't need them, and the shoulder straps are magnetically held to the backpack to keep it nice and compact. It was well worth the research and planning, and a big thanks to everyone here for your input and advice. :clapping::drinks:(y)

Yeah...I probably looked a bit geeky, but it was fast and convenient. I could change cameras at light speed. By the time I walked to my new position I had already made the switch and was ready to shoot.

Hey, at least I wasn't wearing a VEST! :laugh1:
 
Location
Vancouver BC
Name
Graham
I will add the Peak Design (sigh) cuff to this as soon as I get one.
I suggest the PD Clutch instead of the Cuff for your application; it will be quick and easy to slip your hand into (& out of) and lets you avoid the camera body death grip because it holds your palm to the right side of the camera body. You can easily tension it or loosen it as needed.
 
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