Which Operating System

Herman

The Image Stimulator
Jul 11, 2010
123
The Netherlands
Herman
you like / use most?
For phone, pc, wearable, tablet, etc.
I got an i7 laptop computer (asus) running windows 10, using a 13 inch chromebook (toshiba) most.
Looking forward to a pencil supported device for creating notes and sketches.
 

theoldsmithy

Hall of Famer
Jan 7, 2013
124
Cheshire, England
Martin Connolly
I seem to have moved in the last couple of years from Windows/Android to solid Apple (MacOS + iOS). No doubt helped by my employers’ strategic partnership with Apple, but I must say I find the Apple stuff a whole lot easier to use.
 

Herman

The Image Stimulator
Jul 11, 2010
123
The Netherlands
Herman
Thanks Martin for your reply.
I never experienced iOS so far, maybe I should.
Windows is a very time consuming software system,
updating, restarting, scanning.
Chrome OS has proven to me to be very reliable.
 

theoldsmithy

Hall of Famer
Jan 7, 2013
124
Cheshire, England
Martin Connolly
Thanks Martin for your reply.
I never experienced iOS so far, maybe I should.
Windows is a very time consuming software system,
updating, restarting, scanning.
Chrome OS has proven to me to be very reliable.
MacOS needs hardly any effort to maintain. Get an all-purpose cleaner tool like Onyx, and run that once a month. Updates seem to be every couple of months at most. Restart and shutdown are very quick (especially if you have an SSD drive).
iOS is more locked down that Android but at least nothing seems to freeze it.
 

bartjeej

Hall of Famer
Nov 12, 2010
124
bart
I'm not a fan of Google's privacy policies. Apple is somewhat better in that regard. Don't know about windows.
 

Herman

The Image Stimulator
Jul 11, 2010
123
The Netherlands
Herman
Hi David, I am familiar to Windows and Chrome OS.
Just wondering is it hard to get used to Android?
I like the Lenovo Yoga Book, pencil included, halo keyboard, price tag okay.
 
Jan 31, 2011
164
Newcastle, Australia
Sue
MacOS/iOS/WatchOS. They all work together very well for me, though I am not necessarily a fan of the most recent upgrades. I’m happy to keep my computers on the old file system and not have several needed apps break.

I was a Windows user until 2003 at which point I realised I was spending more time making sure I would never get a virus, as well as getting various friends and rellies sorted... than actually using and enjoying the computer. I bought an eMac at that time and sold the Windows computer 6 months later when I hadnt even turned it on for 3-4 months. Been Mac ever since.
 

Luke

Super Moderator
Nov 11, 2011
214
Milwaukee, WI USA
Luke
I vaguely remember when "using computers" was fun. If they weren't an integral part of work, I'd gladly never use one again....even though it would mean not seeing you fine folks. I'm tired of sitting hunched over a computer screen.
 

davect01

Hall of Famer
Last edited:
Aug 27, 2013
124
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Miguel Tejada-Flores
MacOS for multiple desktop computers and laptops.
Being a writer, the multiplicity of brilliant writing and outlining software for Mac OS has simply made this a no-brainer for...well, for decades.
iOS for iPad (obviously) and iPhone. Here again, the Mac ecosystem in my experience tends to be simple, organic, and never 'gets in the way' of what I need to do or want to do.
In terms of power and flexibility, the MacOS systems run circles around iOS but that's another story.
Being an ancient (early adopter) Nerd from the dark ages, I have also used Windows PC's (mainly for computer and video games, which for a long time were superior on Windows machines than Macs), but finally gave up because of the endless viruses which always seemed to periodically infect and or destroy whatever Windows machine I was running. Macs are not completely immune to viruses etc. but in simple real-world terms they are superior in my experience in the sense that they almost never get infected the way my ancient PC's once did.

I actually used MS-DOS and CP-M operating system machines before my first Mac back in the 80's which I think dates me. At the time, both CP-M and MS-DOS were so much more technically oriented and (for technophobes) daunting than the early Mac systems that it was like different universes. Today, the latest iterations of Windows OS's are actually very similar to the Mac OS's of the last decade or two, so, honestly, the differences today aren't what they once were.

As an ancient and brilliant friend once advised me - the best computer and OS to get ... is the one which does the most things you want or need it to.

Words to live by...even decades later.
 

davidzvi

Top Veteran
Apr 18, 2014
104
Boston Burbs
David
.....I actually used MS-DOS and CP-M operating system machines before my first Mac back in the 80's which I think dates me. At the time, both CP-M and MS-DOS were so much more technically oriented and (for technophobes) daunting than the early Mac systems that it was like different universes. Today, the latest iterations of Windows OS's are actually very similar to the Mac OS's of the last decade or two, so, honestly, the differences today aren't what they once were.

As an ancient and brilliant friend once advised me - the best computer and OS to get ... is the one which does the most things you want or need it to.

Words to live by...even decades later.
We had a DEC Rainbow running CP-M in the early '80s and I just sold off an old original IBM PC a few weeks ago.
 

john m flores

All-Pro
Aug 13, 2012
124
MacOS for multiple desktop computers and laptops.
Being a writer, the multiplicity of brilliant writing and outlining software for Mac OS has simply made this a no-brainer for...well, for decades.
iOS for iPad (obviously) and iPhone. Here again, the Mac ecosystem in my experience tends to be simple, organic, and never 'gets in the way' of what I need to do or want to do.
In terms of power and flexibility, the MacOS systems run circles around iOS but that's another story.
Being an ancient (early adopter) Nerd from the dark ages, I have also used Windows PC's (mainly for computer and video games, which for a long time were superior on Windows machines than Macs), but finally gave up because of the endless viruses which always seemed to periodically infect and or destroy whatever Windows machine I was running. Macs are not completely immune to viruses etc. but in simple real-world terms they are superior in my experience in the sense that they almost never get infected the way my ancient PC's once did.

I actually used MS-DOS and CP-M operating system machines before my first Mac back in the 80's which I think dates me. At the time, both CP-M and MS-DOS were so much more technically oriented and (for technophobes) daunting than the early Mac systems that it was like different universes. Today, the latest iterations of Windows OS's are actually very similar to the Mac OS's of the last decade or two, so, honestly, the differences today aren't what they once were.

As an ancient and brilliant friend once advised me - the best computer and OS to get ... is the one which does the most things you want or need it to.

Words to live by...even decades later.
What are you writing with, Miguel? I've been using Scrivener for a decade and like it a lot. I try to choose tools that are cross platform so that switching from Mac to PC is not an issue.
 

drd1135

Zen Snapshooter
Jul 13, 2011
124
Lexington, Virginia
Steve
MacOS/iOS/WatchOS. They all work together very well for me, though I am not necessarily a fan of the most recent upgrades. I’m happy to keep my computers on the old file system and not have several needed apps break.

I was a Windows user until 2003 at which point I realised I was spending more time making sure I would never get a virus, as well as getting various friends and rellies sorted... than actually using and enjoying the computer. I bought an eMac at that time and sold the Windows computer 6 months later when I hadnt even turned it on for 3-4 months. Been Mac ever since.
I forgot WatchOS.
 
Aug 27, 2013
124
Talent, Oregon (far from the madding crowd)
Miguel Tejada-Flores
What are you writing with, Miguel? I've been using Scrivener for a decade and like it a lot. I try to choose tools that are cross platform so that switching from Mac to PC is not an issue.
I write with a few Apps that I use over and over. Scrivener for creative (story) outlining. MS Word because I pretty much have to use it to make comments on other Word files that many colleagues or business contacts use, but personally I have never liked Word (it's too bloated, with too many obscure and weird commands that are impossible to keep track of). For ordinary document writing on my Macs, almost nothing beats Nisus Writer (or the upgraded version I have: Nisus Writer Pro) - which is a combination of simple, organic, but also astoundingly powerful. It does 95% of the important stuff that Word does, and does it far better and far more enjoyably IMHO. For screenwriting, my bread-and-butter, I use both Final Draft (which seems ubiquitous) but also Movie Magic Screenwriter, which I enjoy in many ways. Those are the main ones. But unlike you, John, I don't need to worry about cross-platform switching since I'm using MacOS exclusively. Scrivener finally came out with a Windows version which I hear was eagerly awaited by scores of PC Users. Most everyone gets stuck with Word for one reason or another. And the dedicated screenwriting programs are necessary if that's what one does.
 

donlaw

Hall of Famer
Sep 14, 2012
124
Texas
Don
Mac user since college, now iOS with iPad and iPhone. Simple and elegant as long as you don't mind paying a bit more for the integration/hardware.
Still tied to windows at work, but try to use it a little as possible. Personally find windows 10 to be rather bloated and non-intuitive. The office cloud system still runs on windows 7.
 

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