WiFi security

tonyturley

Legend
Location
Scott Depot, WV, USA
Real Name
Tony
Our WiFi router, which was several years old, has been having hiccups recently, so I tossed it yesterday and installed a new one. I'm not crazy about the fact that I had to install an app on my phone and set up a Netgear account to set up the router, but I did. Twice while going through the setup routine, I got a message on my phone saying "Someone is trying to access your account. Is this you?". Twice I pressed "Deny".

Now I'm not the most tech savvy person around, but I would think the setup routine wouldn't be flagging my own log-in. I eventually got through the firmware update and setup, changing the default passwords and network names. Other than not having WiFi, is there anything else I can do to protect myself?
 
Location
Switzerland
Real Name
Matt
Short answer: No.

Somewhat longer answer (may be obvious): Choose a random (or apparently random - like a personally created and obfuscated acronym) password; don't include information about your own person/family in the router's network name. Use WPA2 *only*. That's about it for your usual options.

It's fiendishly difficult to diagnose machine behaviour at a distance (or by description), so I won't hazard a guess as to what caused the security message; could be over-zealous software settings as well as real trouble, YMMV. But going ahead and securing your router to the best of your ability is a very good start to avoiding trouble. If the machine (router) itself is somewhat faulty, that's something to put up with (or swap out).

M.
 

jyc860923

Veteran
Location
Shenyang, China
Real Name
贾一川
There's nothing to worry about if you don't tell others your WPA2 password, and you can turn off WPS if you don't plan to pair new devices with it.

But more often the threats are from yourself.

Say you have guests visiting and you're concerned about them accessing your home devices when they're, of course, connected to your router, you can set up one or more guest network(s) and/or enable client isolation. Note that client isolation works by cutting off accessibility among devices in LAN so it's likely more harm than good.
 

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